deontology

(redirected from deontologists)
Also found in: Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to deontologists: consequentialists

de·on·tol·o·gy

(dē′ŏn-tŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. de·on·tol·o·gies
1. Ethical or moral theory concerned with duties and rights.
2. The doctrine that ethical status of an action lies in its adherence to a set of rules.

[Greek deon, deont-, obligation, necessity (from neuter present participle of dein, to need, lack; see deu-1 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots) + -logy.]

de·on′to·log′i·cal (-tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
de·on′to·log′i·cal·ly adv.
de′on·tol′o·gist n.

deontology

(ˌdiːɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Philosophy) the branch of ethics dealing with duty, moral obligation, and moral commitment
[C19: from Greek deon duty (see deontic) + -logy]
ˌdeonˈtologist n

de•on•tol•o•gy

(ˌdi ɒnˈtɒl ə dʒi)

n.
ethics dealing esp. with duty, moral obligation, and right action.
[1820–30; < Greek deont- that which is binding (s. of déon, neuter present participle of deîn to bind) + -o- + -logy]
de`on•to•log′i•cal (-tlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
de`on•tol′o•gist, n.

deontology

the branch of philosophy concerned with ethics, especially that branch dealing with duty, moral obligation, and right action. — deontologist, n. — deontological, adj.
See also: Ethics

deontology

The branch of ethics that deals with moral responsibility.
Translations

deontology

[ˌdiːɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ] Ndeontología f

deontology

nPflichtethik f, → Deontologie f
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Dougherty suggests that although a deontic constraint on killing is normally formulated as an agent-relative rule like KR there is an agent-neutral alternative that could serve deontologists equally well:
Sheeran alludes to the fact that 'While deontologists are content with focusing on laws and rules as the principal guidance for public administrators on morality, even they recognize that laws and regulations are insufficient.
Deontologists consider the humanity of the perpetrator, and his free will, to be the very reason why he may be punished, and therefore consider rationales that subject the free will to the good of others to be anathema to criminal punishment.
287, 293 (2011) ("[T]he fundamental dispute of whether principles must dominate, or are dominated by, consequences continues to fume among professed deontologists, avowed consequentialists and those who espouse hybrid approaches.
The researchers turned to the deontologists to attest to the integrity of the research; medical deontology and the ethics of research on human beings were still not yet clearly distinguished, though the Norplant controversy would contribute precisely to changing this situation.
Many deontologists explain the epistemic value of justification in terms of its instrumental role in promoting truth--the original source of value in the epistemic domain.
Since the Romantics are teleologists more than they are deontologists, a transformed utilitarianism has its appeal.
Kantian deontologists might apply one or more of the preliminary articles for perpetual peace to say that state vulnerability is morally required, and yet some measure of prudence must be retained in deciding on the kind of signal sent and the means of sending it.
Moreover, contemporary deontologists typically allow that maximizing good results (happiness, generally) is relevant to questions about right action, even if it is not the whole (or even the main) story.
Deontologists say that moral rightness or wrongness of an action is based on the intrinsic qualities of the action.
How these norms are founded is a further problem for deontologists, but that is not our worry here.
Similarly, there is widespread pluralism about how best to understand morality; should we be utilitarians, deontologists, virtue ethicists, natural law theorists, should we believe in rights, or should we be nihilists or moral skeptics?