deontology

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Related to deontologists: consequentialists

de·on·tol·o·gy

(dē′ŏn-tŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. de·on·tol·o·gies
1. Ethical or moral theory concerned with duties and rights.
2. The doctrine that ethical status of an action lies in its adherence to a set of rules.

[Greek deon, deont-, obligation, necessity (from neuter present participle of dein, to need, lack; see deu-1 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots) + -logy.]

de·on′to·log′i·cal (-tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
de·on′to·log′i·cal·ly adv.
de′on·tol′o·gist n.

deontology

(ˌdiːɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Philosophy) the branch of ethics dealing with duty, moral obligation, and moral commitment
[C19: from Greek deon duty (see deontic) + -logy]
ˌdeonˈtologist n

de•on•tol•o•gy

(ˌdi ɒnˈtɒl ə dʒi)

n.
ethics dealing esp. with duty, moral obligation, and right action.
[1820–30; < Greek deont- that which is binding (s. of déon, neuter present participle of deîn to bind) + -o- + -logy]
de`on•to•log′i•cal (-tlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
de`on•tol′o•gist, n.

deontology

the branch of philosophy concerned with ethics, especially that branch dealing with duty, moral obligation, and right action. — deontologist, n. — deontological, adj.
See also: Ethics

deontology

The branch of ethics that deals with moral responsibility.
Translations

deontology

[ˌdiːɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ] Ndeontología f

deontology

nPflichtethik f, → Deontologie f
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References in periodicals archive ?
One of their persistent criticisms of deontologists is that we do not seem capable of settling on a shared definition of various of the notions of fairness at play.
And by "duty" deontologists usually mean that one's behavior is permitted or demanded by a first principle or general rule regarding morality, such as "Thou shall not lie," or "Honor thy father and mother.
For both consequentialists and deontologists, the killing of innocent people could be justified in some imaginable world.
Perhaps deontologists are correct to insist on the maxim "evil shall come into the world, but not through me" as the guide even for those who undertake responsibility for their communities' conditions of life.
For discussion of Grisez's notion of basic goods, see Bernard Hoose, "Proportionalists, Deontologists and the Human Good," Heythrop Journal 33 (1992) 175-91; Robert P.
Deontologists suggest not only that it is impermissible to
Consideration of why deontologists should not agree that their
Should the acts of intercourse and the effects of those acts be at the center of ethical discussion, as they were for the deontologists and the proportionalists?
Not all deontologists and consequentialists would attempt to reduce the virtues to mere dispositions to perform certain actions or to maximize the good.
The qualification "at least in part" acknowledges that many deontologists (notably, for our purposes, Tom Regan) distinguish "moderate" from "extreme" versions of deontological theories.
Deontologists will find little comfort in this timely return to exploring the continuities between nature and the good.
Like deontologists, rule-utilitarians apply specified principles, or rules, to make decisions and ethical judgments.