deoxyribose


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Related to deoxyribose: phosphodiester bond

de·ox·y·ri·bose

 (dē-ŏk′sē-rī′bōs′)
n.
A sugar, C5H10O4, that is a constituent of DNA.

deoxyribose

(diːˌɒksɪˈraɪbəʊs; -bəʊz) or

desoxyribose

n
(Biochemistry) a pentose sugar obtained by the hydrolysis of DNA. Formula: C5H10O4

de•ox•y•ri•bose

(diˌɒk sɪˈraɪ boʊs)

n.
1. any of certain carbohydrates derived from ribose by the replacement of a hydroxyl group with a hydrogen atom.
2. the sugar, HOCH2(CHOH)2CH2CHO, obtained from DNA by hydrolysis.
[1930–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deoxyribose - a sugar that is a constituent of nucleic acidsdeoxyribose - a sugar that is a constituent of nucleic acids
carbohydrate, saccharide, sugar - an essential structural component of living cells and source of energy for animals; includes simple sugars with small molecules as well as macromolecular substances; are classified according to the number of monosaccharide groups they contain
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In April 1953 US biologist James Watson and English physicist Francis Crick published A Structure For Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid, showing the double-helix structure of DNA - the building block of life.
Hydroxyl radical scavenging was carried out by measuring the competition between deoxyribose and the essential oil of different parts of Senecio graciliflorus DC for hydroxyl radicals generated in Fenton reaction.
Crick, Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids: A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid, 171 NATURE 737, 737 (1953) (giving an illustration of the structure of DNA).
In molecular structure of DNA in body cells such as sperm, free radicals can lead to the oxidation of purine and pyrimidine bases, breakage in one or two chromosome strands, formation of positions lacking base, formation of cross-bridges between DNA and protein, and change in deoxyribose sugar.
Nucleic Acids--A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid, 171 Nature 737,
The single--OH group difference makes the ribose sugar much more chemically reactive than its deoxyribose cousin.
Watson published a short paper in the journal Nature with a quiet title: "Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids: A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid.
In 1953 Francis Crick and James D Watson published a short paper in the journal Nature with a quiet title: "Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids: A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid.
In the backbone of every DNA molecule there are repeating units of deoxyribose sugar; in the RNA backbone, it's ribose sugar.
Thymidine like uridine acts as a bidentate ligand involving N(3) and O(4) in metal binding [7] and rules out the possibility to bind through the deoxyribose unit [8].