departmentalism


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departmentalism

(ˌdiːpɑːtˈmɛntəˌlɪzəm)
n
division into departments, esp when resulting in impaired efficiency

departmentalism

advocacy of the division of something, such as an educational institution, into departments. — departmentalization, n.
See also: Politics
Translations

departmentalism

nGliederung fin Abteilungen
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References in periodicals archive ?
897 (2005); and Robert Post & Reva Siegel, Popular Constitutionalism, Departmentalism, and Judicial Supremacy, 92 Calif.
Popular constitutionalism places authority in the people's hands; departmentalism places authority in the hands of the legislative, executive, and judicial departments.
REFORM 971 (2010); Robert Post & Reva Siegel, Popular Constitutionalism, Departmentalism, and Judicial Supremacy, 92 CALIF.
Kerr, supra note 58; see also Hansen, supra note 28, at 1179 ("The Obama Administration's asserted justification fell outside the nondefense framework and pushed departmentalism to a level never previously experienced.
For example, in what one might consider a rather feeble variant on departmentalism, (390) the PPP-led government questioned the court's disqualification and dismissal of Gilani and, even after designating a new Prime Minister, Raja Pervez Ashraf, to replace Gilani, continued to resist the court's orders to write the Swiss letter in the NRO Case.
departmentalist or detractor of departmentalism has convincingly
repeatedly chose departmentalism over judicial supremacy through the New
These initiatives are described as the opposite of departmentalism, tunnel vision and vertical silos.
Describing the tensions between civil servants from different departments, he said: "I think that the departmentalism in Whitehall does mean it's built into certain civil servants' DNA that they have to be very cautious about what they say to each other and that is amplified, I think, when they realise they are talking to officials of a different jurisdiction.
The unitary executive theory has three basic components: (1) departmentalism, which asserts that the President's power to interpret the Constitution is at least equal to that of the Court or Congress; (2) exclusivism, which asserts that all executive power under the Constitution rests solely with the President; and (3) executive power protectionism, which holds that the executive powers of the President may not constitutionally be appropriated, divested, or diluted by Congress.
In policy-making, campaigns for 'joined-up government' can do something to mitigate the follies of excessive departmentalism.

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