deportment


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Related to deportment: comportment

de·port·ment

 (dĭ-pôrt′mənt)
n.
A manner of personal conduct; behavior. See Synonyms at behavior.

deportment

(dɪˈpɔːtmənt)
n
the manner in which a person behaves, esp in physical bearing: military deportment.
[C17: from French déportement, from Old French deporter to conduct (oneself); see deport]

de•port•ment

(dɪˈpɔrt mənt, -ˈpoʊrt-)

n.
conduct; behavior.
[1595–1605; < French déportement=déporte(r) (see deport) + -ment -ment]
comportment, deportment - Deportment adds the sense of action or activity to a mode of conduct or behavior; comportment, "behavior or bearing," does not have this.
See also related terms for mode.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deportment - (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other peopledeportment - (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other people
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
manners - social deportment; "he has the manners of a pig"
citizenship - conduct as a citizen; "award for good citizenship"
swashbuckling - flamboyantly reckless and boastful behavior
correctitude, properness, propriety - correct or appropriate behavior
improperness, impropriety - an improper demeanor
personal manner, manner - a way of acting or behaving

deportment

noun bearing, conduct, behaviour, manner, stance, carriage, posture, demeanour, air, mien, comportment Deportment and poise were considered important for young ladies.

deportment

noun
The manner in which one behaves:
action (often used in plural), behavior, comportment, conduct, way.
Translations

deportment

[dɪˈpɔːtmənt] N (= behaviour) → conducta f, comportamiento m; (= carriage) → porte m

deportment

[dɪˈpɔːrtmənt] n (= bearing) [person] → maintien m, tenue f

deportment

nHaltung f; (= behaviour)Verhalten nt, → Benehmen nt; lessons in deportmentHaltungsschulung f, → Anstandsunterricht m

deportment

[dɪˈpɔːtmənt] n (old) (bearing) → portamento; (behaviour) → comportamento
References in classic literature ?
He is celebrated almost everywhere for his deportment.
It has been delightful to me to watch his advances towards intimacy, especially to observe his altered manner in consequence of my repressing by the cool dignity of my deportment his insolent approach to direct familiarity.
My dear cousin," said Judge Pyncheon, with a quietude which he had the power of making more formidable than any violence, "since your brother's return, I have taken the precaution (a highly proper one in the near kinsman and natural guardian of an individual so situated) to have his deportment and habits constantly and carefully overlooked.
The brief remainder of the evening passed in excited chatter and cigarettes, and in my instructing Nicolete in certain tricks of masculine deportment.
Indeed, her conversation was so pure, her looks so sage, and her whole deportment so grave and solemn, that she seemed to deserve the name of saint equally with her namesake, or with any other female in the Roman kalendar.
At all events, the health of the good town of Boston, so far as medicine had aught to do with it, had hitherto lain in the guardianship of an aged deacon and apothecary, whose piety and godly deportment were stronger testimonials in his favour than any that he could have produced in the shape of a diploma.
Zoraide might have aided him in the solution of the enigma; at any rate I soon found that the uncertainty of doubt had vanished from his manner; renouncing all pretence of friendship and cordiality, he adopted a reserved, formal, but still scrupulously polite deportment.
His fearless deportment, his words, so firm, yet dignified, the shades which by one word he had evoked, recalled to her the past in all its intoxication of poetry and romance, youth, beauty, the eclat of love at twenty years of age, the bloody death of Buckingham, the only man whom she had ever really loved, and the heroism of those obscure champions who had saved her from the double hatred of Richelieu and the king.
Sir William Howe was a dark-complexioned man, stern and haughty in his deportment.
Then she returned to the ball, and gave me a further account of her deportment there, and at the several parties she had since attended; and further particulars respecting Sir Thomas Ashby and Messrs.
Marilla had almost begun to despair of ever fashioning this waif of the world into her model little girl of demure manners and prim deportment.
This evening it was not I observed it, but judging by the impression made on the company, everyone observed that your conduct and deportment were not altogether what could be desired.