depress

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de·press

 (dĭ-prĕs′)
tr.v. de·pressed, de·press·ing, de·press·es
1. To cause to be sad or dejected.
2.
a. To cause to drop or sink; lower: The drought depressed the water level in the reservoirs.
b. To press down: Depress the space bar on a typewriter.
3. To lessen the activity or force of; weaken: feared that rising inflation would further depress the economy.
4. To lower prices in (a financial market).

[Middle English depressen, to push down, from Old French depresser, from Latin dēprimere, dēpress- : dē-, de- + premere, to press; see per-4 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

de·press′i·ble adj.

depress

(dɪˈprɛs)
vb (tr)
1. (Psychology) to lower in spirits; make gloomy; deject
2. to weaken or lower the force, vigour, or energy of
3. (Stock Exchange) to lower prices of (securities or a security market)
4. to press or push down
5. (Music, other) to lower the pitch of (a musical sound)
6. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) obsolete to suppress or subjugate
[C14: from Old French depresser, from Latin dēprimere from de- + premere to press1]
deˈpressible adj

de•press

(dɪˈprɛs)

v.t.
1. to make sad or gloomy; lower in spirits; dispirit.
2. to lower in force, vigor, activity, etc.; weaken.
3. to lower in amount or value.
4. to put into a lower position; press down.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French depresser < Late Latin depressāre, frequentative of dēprimere=de- de- + -primere, comb. form of premere to press]
de•press′i•ble, adj.
de•press`i•bil′i•ty, n.

depress


Past participle: depressed
Gerund: depressing

Imperative
depress
depress
Present
I depress
you depress
he/she/it depresses
we depress
you depress
they depress
Preterite
I depressed
you depressed
he/she/it depressed
we depressed
you depressed
they depressed
Present Continuous
I am depressing
you are depressing
he/she/it is depressing
we are depressing
you are depressing
they are depressing
Present Perfect
I have depressed
you have depressed
he/she/it has depressed
we have depressed
you have depressed
they have depressed
Past Continuous
I was depressing
you were depressing
he/she/it was depressing
we were depressing
you were depressing
they were depressing
Past Perfect
I had depressed
you had depressed
he/she/it had depressed
we had depressed
you had depressed
they had depressed
Future
I will depress
you will depress
he/she/it will depress
we will depress
you will depress
they will depress
Future Perfect
I will have depressed
you will have depressed
he/she/it will have depressed
we will have depressed
you will have depressed
they will have depressed
Future Continuous
I will be depressing
you will be depressing
he/she/it will be depressing
we will be depressing
you will be depressing
they will be depressing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been depressing
you have been depressing
he/she/it has been depressing
we have been depressing
you have been depressing
they have been depressing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been depressing
you will have been depressing
he/she/it will have been depressing
we will have been depressing
you will have been depressing
they will have been depressing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been depressing
you had been depressing
he/she/it had been depressing
we had been depressing
you had been depressing
they had been depressing
Conditional
I would depress
you would depress
he/she/it would depress
we would depress
you would depress
they would depress
Past Conditional
I would have depressed
you would have depressed
he/she/it would have depressed
we would have depressed
you would have depressed
they would have depressed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.depress - lower someone's spirits; make downhearted; "These news depressed her"; "The bad state of her child's health demoralizes her"
chill - depress or discourage; "The news of the city's surrender chilled the soldiers"
discourage - deprive of courage or hope; take away hope from; cause to feel discouraged
elate, intoxicate, uplift, lift up, pick up - fill with high spirits; fill with optimism; "Music can uplift your spirits"
2.depress - lower (prices or markets); "The glut of oil depressed gas prices"
bring down, let down, lower, take down, get down - move something or somebody to a lower position; "take down the vase from the shelf"
3.depress - cause to drop or sink; "The lack of rain had depressed the water level in the reservoir"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
4.depress - press down; "Depress the space key"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
5.depress - lessen the activity or force of; "The rising inflation depressed the economy"
weaken - lessen the strength of; "The fever weakened his body"

depress

verb
1. sadden, upset, distress, chill, discourage, grieve, daunt, oppress, desolate, weigh down, cast down, bring tears to your eyes, make sad, dishearten, dispirit, make your heart bleed, aggrieve, deject, make despondent, cast a gloom upon The state of the country depresses me.
sadden cheer, strengthen, uplift, hearten, elate
2. lower, cut, reduce, check, diminish, decrease, curb, slow down, impair, lessen The stronger currency depressed sales.
lower increase, raise, strengthen, heighten
3. devalue, cut, reduce, diminish, depreciate, cheapen, devaluate A dearth of buyers has depressed prices
4. press down, push, squeeze, lower, flatten, compress, push down, bear down on He depressed the pedal that lowered the chair.

depress

verb
1. To make sad or gloomy:
2. To cause to descend:
3. To become or make less in price or value:
Translations
يُسَبِّب الكآبَهيُقَلِّل نَشاط، يُخْفِض القُوَّه
mírnitsklíčitsnížit
deprimeregøre deprimeretgøre i dårligt humørsvække
lenyompangást idéz elő
draga úrhryggja
ekonominė krizėįdubaprislėgtiprislopintasslegiantis
mazinātnomāktnospiestvājināt
skľúčiť
potreti

depress

[dɪˈpres] VT
1. [+ person] (= make miserable) → deprimir, abatir; (= discourage) → desalentar (Psych) → tener un efecto depresivo sobre (Med) [+ immune system] → deprimir
2. (Fin) [+ trade, price] → reducir
3. (frm) (= press down) [+ button, accelerator] → apretar; [+ lever] → bajar

depress

[dɪˈprɛs] vt
(= make depressed) [+ person] → déprimer
it depresses me to ... → cela me déprime de ...
(= cause to fall) [+ sales, prices] → faire baisser
(= press down) [+ lever, brake] → appuyer sur, abaisser

depress

vt
persondeprimieren; immune systemschwächen; (= discourage)entmutigen
(= press down) leverniederdrücken, herunterdrücken; push buttondrücken, betätigen
(Comm) marketschwächen; pricesfallen lassen; saleszurückgehen lassen

depress

[dɪˈprɛs] vt
a. (person) → deprimere; (spirits) → buttar giù
b. (trade) → ridurre; (prices) → far scendere, abbassare
c. (frm) (press down, lever) → abbassare

depress

(diˈpres) verb
1. to make sad or gloomy. I am always depressed by wet weather.
2. to make less active. This drug depresses the action of the heart.
deˈpressed adjective
1. sad or unhappy. The news made me very depressed.
2. made less active. the depressed state of the stock market.
deˈpressing adjective
tending to make one sad or gloomy. What a depressing piece of news!
deˈpression (-ʃən) noun
1. a state of sadness and low spirits. She was treated by the doctor for depression.
2. lack of activity in trade. the depression of the 1930s.
3. an area of low pressure in the atmosphere. The bad weather is caused by a depression.
4. a hollow.

depress

vt. deprimir; desalentar, desanimar.
References in classic literature ?
But supplementary to this, it has hypothetically occurred to me, that as ordinary fish possess what is called a swimming bladder in them, capable, at will, of distension or contraction; and as the Sperm Whale, as far as I know, has no such provision in him; considering, too, the otherwise inexplicable manner in which he now depresses his head altogether beneath the surface, and anon swims with it high elevated out of the water; considering the unobstructed elasticity of its envelop; considering the unique interior of his head; it has hypothetically occurred to me, I say, that those mystical lung-celled honeycombs there may possibly have some hitherto unknown and unsuspected connexion with the outer air, so as to be susceptible to atmospheric distension and contraction.
It depresses me," murmured Lord Henry, examining his rings.
This house depresses and chills one,' said Kate, 'and seems as if some blight had fallen on it.