deprival


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de·priv·al

 (dĭ-prī′vəl)
n.
Deprivation.
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deprival

noun
The condition of being deprived of what one once had or ought to have:
References in periodicals archive ?
To generate motion, plants and some seeds -- such as mimosa leaves, Venus flytraps and pine cones -- simply harness the supply or deprival of water from plant tissues.
44) In a large majority of the cases reviewed, sexual minorities recounted having endured troubling experiences including: deprival of family support, (45) vandalism, (46) harassment from police, (47) arrest, (48) death threats, (49) unemployment, (50) dismissal from university, (51) and physical assaults.
Meanwhile control and deprival of autonomy may be done intending benevolence or exploitation [4].
It's simple, satisfying and there's no sense of deprival.
Sanctions were imposed on them, including family visit deprival for a month, and confiscation of electronic devices and the prisoners' belongings.
Supreme Court's focus on the deprival of liberty and the notion that imprisonment is an extremely severe type of punishment.
24) The primordial meaning of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is not even related to [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], since the concept of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] denotes primarily a deprival of oblivion/ concealment: it means "taking the beings into true safekeeping as unveiled.
Hinduism told us that joy and renunciation needed each other and renunciation was not deprival, it was freedom.
Deprival of women due to displacement is compounded with the absence of productive employment in the resettlement area.