deprived


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de·prived

 (dĭ-prīvd′)
adj.
1. Marked by deprivation, especially of economic or social necessities.
2. Lacking in advantage, opportunity, or experience: "Preschool is designed to give children from educationally deprived households an early boost" (Jeff Brody).

deprived

(dɪˈpraɪvd)
adj
(Social Welfare) lacking adequate food, shelter, education, etc: deprived inner-city areas.

de•prived

(dɪˈpraɪvd)

adj.
marked by deprivation; lacking the necessities of life.
[1545–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.deprived - marked by deprivation especially of the necessities of life or healthful environmental influences; "a childhood that was unhappy and deprived, the family living off charity"; "boys from a deprived environment, wherein the family life revealed a pattern of neglect, moral degradation, and disregard for law"
underprivileged - lacking the rights and advantages of other members of society

deprived

adjective poor, disadvantaged, needy, in need, lacking, bereft, destitute, in want, denuded, down at heel, necessitous the problems associated with life in a deprived inner city area
successful, favoured, lucky, fortunate, prosperous, well-off, sitting pretty (informal), having a charmed life, born with a silver spoon in your mouth

deprived

adjective
Economically and socially below standard:
Translations
مَحْروم
zanedbaný
dårligt stilletfattigunderpriviligeret
afskiptur, fátækur

deprived

[dɪˈpraɪvd] ADJ [child, family] → necesitado, desventajado; [area, district] → marginado
she had a deprived childhoodtuvo una niñez llena de privaciones
emotionally deprived childrenniños con carencias afectivas
to feel deprivedsentirse en desventaja

deprived

[dɪˈpraɪvd] adj (= poor) [area, person] → défavorisé(e)
socially deprived [area] → socialement défavorisé(e)

deprived

adj person, backgroundbenachteiligt; childhoodarm; area(wirtschaftlich) benachteiligt; the deprived areas of the citydie Armenviertel der Stadt

deprived

[dɪˈpraɪvd] adjbisognoso/a

deprive

(diˈpraiv) verb
(with of) to take something away from. They deprived him of food and drink.
deprivation (depriˈveiʃən) noun
1. (a condition of) loss, hardship etc.
2. (an) act of depriving.
deˈprived adjective
suffering from hardship etc, under-privileged. deprived areas of the city.
References in classic literature ?
By her next speech, Jo deprived herself of several years of pleasure, and received a timely lesson in the art of holding her tongue.
On a few previous occasions she had been completely deprived of any desire to finish her dinner.
The sun had already disappeared, and the woods, suddenly deprived of his light*, were assuming a dusky hue, which keenly reminded him that the hour the savage usually chose for his most barbarous and remorseless acts of vengeance or hostility, was speedily drawing near.
He has been deprived of his city of refuge, and, in my humble opinion, has suffered infinite wrong
It was impossible to have given less encouragement than he had done to such a doctrine, but if we had not had the doctrine to fall back upon we should have deprived each other of some of our finest exhibitions.
so, deprived of one leg, and the strange ship of course being altogether unsupplied with the kindly invention, Ahab now found himself abjectly reduced to a clumsy landsman again; hopelessly eyeing the uncertain changeful height he could hardly hope to attain.
Elzbieta was one of the primitive creatures: like the angleworm, which goes on living though cut in half; like a hen, which, deprived of her chickens one by one, will mother the last that is left her.
Terror had deprived him of all presence of mind; he threw himself along the floor, and nothing could persuade him to rise.
Hear and obey: --You will immediately remove every trace of your offensive work from the Schiller monument; you pay a fine of ten thousand francs; you will suffer two years' imprisonment at hard labor; you will then be horsewhipped, tarred and feathered, deprived of your ears, ridden on a rail to the confines of the canton, and banished forever.
They rightly claimed that "Tom" was lawfully their property and had been so for eight years; that they had already lost sufficiently in being deprived of his services during that long period, and ought not to be required to add anything to that loss; that if he had been delivered up to them in the first place, they would have sold him and he could not have murdered Judge Driscoll; therefore it was not that he had really committed the murder, the guilt lay with the erroneous inventory.
I could not tell why I ought to be deprived of the same privilege.
Bates, deprived of her usual employment, slumbering on one side of the fire, Frank Churchill, at a table near her, most deedily occupied about her spectacles, and Jane Fairfax, standing with her back to them, intent on her pianoforte.