Depriver


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De`priv´er


n.1.One who, or that which, deprives.
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That hurt, especially given the fact that it was Lions year, but not as much as the Grand Slam depriver 12 months before.
supra note 1, at 96-107 ("both a depriver and a deprivee of human rights" (96), multinational corporations' "deprivations and nonfulfillment" of human rights values (103-04)), 585, 587, 807-10; E.
Nevertheless, Father Smith is able, like the mature Will Barrett, to name the truth of their condition, and so not fall victim to the great depriver, Satan.
24), Ockham defined "right of using" (ius utendi) as "a licit power of using an external thing of which one ought not be deprived against one's will, without one's own fault and without reasonable cause, and if one has been deprived, one can call the depriver into court.
He defined the notion of the right of use (ius utendi) as "a licit power of using an external thing of which one ought not to be deprived against one's will, without one's own fault and without reasonable cause, and if one has been deprived, one can call the depriver into court.
With work- and family- related stress or ailments such as allergies or a common cold registering as among the top sleep deprivers, women often think there is little they can do to get better rest.
They are known as deprivers, and they are reviled, shunned, feared and hunted.
Employers and Governors as Relievers as Well as Deprivers When the demand for products and/or the supply of revenue went down, many employers put their workers on short-time, or laid them off altogether.