derby


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Related to derby: Roller derby

Der·by

 (där′bē)
A city of central England west of Nottingham. First founded by the Romans as a garrison town, it was one of the centers of the Industrial Revolution.

der·by

 (dûr′bē; British där′bē)
n. pl. der·bies
1. Sports Any of various annual horseraces, especially for three-year-olds.
2. Sports A formal race usually having an open field of contestants: a motorcycle derby.
3. A stiff felt hat with a round crown and a narrow, curved brim.

[After Edward Stanley, 12th Earl of Derby, (1752-1834), founder of the English Derby.]

derby

(ˈdɜːrbɪ)
n, pl -bies
(Clothing & Fashion) US and Canadian a stiff felt hat with a rounded crown and narrow curved brim. Also called (in Britain and certain other countries): bowler

Derby

(ˈdɑːbɪ; US ˈdɜːrbɪ)
n
1. (Horse Racing) the Derby an annual horse race run at Epsom Downs, Surrey, since 1780: one of the English flat-racing classics
2. (Horse Racing) any of various other horse races
3. (Soccer) local Derby a football match between two teams from the same area
[C18: named after the twelfth Earl of Derby (died 1834), who founded the horse race at Epsom Downs in 1780]

Derby

(ˈdɑːbɪ)
n
1. (Placename) a city in central England, in Derby unitary authority, Derbyshire: engineering industries (esp aircraft engines and railway rolling stock); university (1991). Pop: 229 407 (2001)
2. (Placename) a unitary authority in central England, in Derbyshire. Pop: 233 200 (2003 est). Area: 78 sq km (30 sq miles)
3. (Cookery) a firm-textured pale-coloured type of cheese
4. (Cookery) sage Derby a green-and-white Derby cheese flavoured with sage

Derby

(ˈdɑːbɪ)
n
(Biography) Earl of. title of Edward George Geoffrey Smith Stanley. 1799–1869, British statesman; Conservative prime minister (1852; 1858–59; 1866–68)

Der•by

(ˈdɜr bi; Brit. ˈdɑr-)

n., pl. -bies.
1. a race for three-year-old horses held annually at Epsom Downs, near London, England: first run in 1780.
2. any of certain other annual horse races, esp. the Kentucky Derby.
3. (l.c.) a race or contest, usu. one open to all entrants.
4. (l.c.) a man's stiff felt hat with rounded crown and narrow brim; bowler.
[1830–40; after Edward Stanley, 12th Earl of Derby (d. 1834)]

Der•by

(ˈdɜr bi; Brit. ˈdɑr-)

n.
1. a city in Derbyshire, in central England. 230,500.

derby

A men’s felt hat with a stiff, curved brim and a rounded crown.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.derby - a felt hat that is round and hard with a narrow brimderby - a felt hat that is round and hard with a narrow brim
chapeau, hat, lid - headdress that protects the head from bad weather; has shaped crown and usually a brim

derby

noun competition, event, championship, tournament, contest, puzzle, quiz, head-to-head He caught a salmon in the annual fishing derby.
Translations
hevoskilpailukilpailuknalli

derby

1 [ˈdɑːbɪ] (US) [ˈdɜːbɪ] N
1. (Sport) local derbyderbi m
2. the Derby (Brit) (Horse racing) → el Derby (importante carrera de caballos en Inglaterra)

derby

2 [ˈdɜːbɪ] N (US) (also derby hat) → sombrero m hongo, bombín m

derby

[ˈdɑːrbɪ] n
(= sporting event) → derby m
(= hat) → chapeau m melon, melon m

Derby

[, (US)]
n
(US: also Derby hat) → Melone f
(= local Derby)(Lokal)derby nt
(Racing) → Derby nt

derby

[ˈdɑːbɪ] n
a. (sporting event) → derby m inv
b. (Am) (hat) → bombetta
References in classic literature ?
In my native town of Salem, at the head of what, half a century ago, in the days of old King Derby, was a bustling wharf -- but which is now burdened with decayed wooden warehouses, and exhibits few or no symptoms of commercial life; except, perhaps, a bark or brig, half-way down its melancholy length, discharging hides; or, nearer at hand, a Nova Scotia schooner, pitching out her cargo of firewood -- at the head, I say, of this dilapidated wharf, which the tide often overflows, and along which, at the base and in the rear of the row of buildings, the track of many languid years is seen in a border of unthrifty grass -- here, with a view from its front windows adown this not very enlivening prospect, and thence across the harbour, stands a spacious edifice of brick.
I have no more desire or need to be a good shot than to be king of England, or owner of a Derby winner, or anything else equally ridiculous, and yet I never missed my aim in my life--thank blind fortune for nothing
He was a man loved and honored by all who knew him, and in his youth was, I have heard, the inventor of a burnt rum punch, much patronized on Derby night.
They seemed to increase as night drew on, until at last the roads, my brother said, were like Epsom High Street on a Derby Day.
In crossing the principal street in Derby the four friends perceived Blaisois standing in the doorway of a handsome house.
His brown derby, the rim of which made almost three quarters of a circle at each side, seemed to want to get as far as possible from his ears and, at the same time, remain perched on his head.
So were the Pope and the Derby Winner; but the idea of their intimate acquaintanceship would have struck Kidd as equally incongruous.
The du Lac Sevres and the Trevenna George II plate were out; so was the van der Luyden "Lowestoft" (East India Company) and the Dagonet Crown Derby.
Until he married he led the ordinary life of his fellows, gambling mildly on the Exchange, interested to the extent of a sovereign or two on the result of the Derby or the Oxford and Cambridge Race.
I would sooner have won this than won the Derby, my boy.
Beside these are many other woodlands in Nottingham and Derby, Lincoln and York, amid any of which Your Majesty might as well think to seize upon Robin Hood as to lay finger upon a rat among the dust and broken things of a garret.
It was one member who said to him that Saucy Sarah would win the Derby and another who said that Saucy Sarah had no chance, but it was William who agreed with both.