derision


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de·ri·sion

 (dĭ-rĭzh′ən)
n.
1. The act of ridiculing or laughing at someone or something.
2. A state of being derided: Members of the board held the proposal in derision.

[Middle English derisioun, from Anglo-Norman, from Late Latin dērīsiō, dērīsiōn-, from Latin dērīsus, past participle of dērīdēre, to deride; see deride.]

derision

(dɪˈrɪʒən)
n
1. the act of deriding; mockery; scorn
2. an object of mockery or scorn
[C15: from Late Latin dērīsiō, from Latin dērīsus; see deride]

de•ri•sion

(dɪˈrɪʒ ən)

n.
1. the act of deriding; ridicule; mockery.
2. an object of ridicule.
[1350–1400; Middle English derisioun < Old French derision < Late Latin dērīsiō; see deride, -tion]
de•ris′i•ble (-ˈrɪz ə bəl) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.derision - contemptuous laughterderision - contemptuous laughter    
discourtesy, disrespect - an expression of lack of respect
jeer, jeering, mockery, scoff, scoffing - showing your contempt by derision
put-down, squelch, squelcher, takedown - a crushing remark
befooling, stultification - derision of someone or something as foolish or absurd or inconsistent
2.derision - the act of deriding or treating with contempt
offense, offensive activity, discourtesy, offence - a lack of politeness; a failure to show regard for others; wounding the feelings or others
mock - the act of mocking or ridiculing; "they made a mock of him"

derision

noun mockery, laughter, contempt, ridicule, scorn, insult, sneering, disdain, scoffing, disrespect, denigration, disparagement, contumely, raillery He tried to calm them but was greeted with shouts of derision.

derision

noun
Words or actions intended to evoke contemptuous laughter:
Translations
سُخْرِيَه، هُزْء
posměchvýsměch
hånspot
kigúnyoláskinevetéskicsúfolás
hæîni; hæînishlátur

derision

[dɪˈrɪʒən] Nmofa f, burla f, irrisión f
this was greeted with hoots of derisionesto fue recibido con gran mofa or sonoras burlas, esto provocó gran irrisión

derision

[dɪˈrɪʒən] ndérision f
with derision → avec dérision
to be greeted with derision (= ridiculed) → être accueilli(e) avec sarcasme

derision

nHohn m, → Spott m; object of derisionZielscheibe fdes Spotts; to be greeted with derisionspöttisch or mit Spott aufgenommen werden

derision

[dɪˈrɪʒn] nderisione f

deride

(diˈraid) verb
to laugh at; to mock.
derision (diˈriʒən) noun
mockery or laughter which shows scorn and contempt. His remarks were greeted with shouts of derision.
deˈrisive (-siv) adjective
1. mocking; showing scorn. derisive laughter.
2. causing or deserving scorn. The salary they offered me was derisive.
deˈrisory (-səri) adjective
ridiculous. His attempts were derisory.
References in classic literature ?
Nina interpreted the stories about the creche fancifully, and in spite of our derision she cherished a belief that Christ was born in Bohemia a short time before the Shimerdas left that country.
Throwing back her light vestment, she stretched forth her long, skinny arm, in derision, and using the language of the Lenape, as more intelligible to the subject of her gibes, she commenced aloud:
Instead of it even-- as a woman reads another--she could see what I myself saw: his derision, his amusement, his contempt for the breakdown of my resignation at being left alone and for the fine machinery I had set in motion to attract his attention to my slighted charms.
Surprise and astonishment flashed from face to face all over the house; the queen's gratified smile faded out at the name of Sir Kay, and she looked disap- pointed; and the page whispered in my ear with an accent and manner expressive of extravagant derision --
The new boy took two broad coppers out of his pocket and held them out with derision.
Heathcliff measured the height and breadth of the speaker with an eye full of derision.
After receiving the charge with every mark of derision, the pupils formed in line and buzzingly passed a ragged book from hand to hand.
Mightie Father, thou thy foes Justly hast in derision, and secure Laugh'st at thir vain designes and tumults vain, Matter to mee of Glory, whom thir hate Illustrates, when they see all Regal Power Giv'n me to quell thir pride, and in event Know whether I be dextrous to subdue Thy Rebels, or be found the worst in Heav'n.
As the Jew, stunned by the request, afraid to refuse, and unwilling to comply, fumbled in the furred bag which hung by his girdle, and was perhaps endeavouring to ascertain how few coins might pass for a handful, the Prince stooped from his jennet and settled Isaac's doubts by snatching the pouch itself from his side; and flinging to Wamba a couple of the gold pieces which it contained, he pursued his career round the lists, leaving the Jew to the derision of those around him, and himself receiving as much applause from the spectators as if he had done some honest and honourable action.
This was the movement that excited the derision of Wickens's boy in the adjacent gravel pit.
It was a smile that had in it something both of pain and weakness--a haggard old man's smile; but there was, besides that, a grain of derision, a shadow of treachery, in his expression as he craftily watched, and watched, and watched me at my work.
Reeling and Writhing, of course, to begin with,' the Mock Turtle replied; `and then the different branches of Arithmetic-- Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and Derision.