derision


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de·ri·sion

 (dĭ-rĭzh′ən)
n.
1. The act of ridiculing or laughing at someone or something.
2. A state of being derided: Members of the board held the proposal in derision.

[Middle English derisioun, from Anglo-Norman, from Late Latin dērīsiō, dērīsiōn-, from Latin dērīsus, past participle of dērīdēre, to deride; see deride.]

derision

(dɪˈrɪʒən)
n
1. the act of deriding; mockery; scorn
2. an object of mockery or scorn
[C15: from Late Latin dērīsiō, from Latin dērīsus; see deride]

de•ri•sion

(dɪˈrɪʒ ən)

n.
1. the act of deriding; ridicule; mockery.
2. an object of ridicule.
[1350–1400; Middle English derisioun < Old French derision < Late Latin dērīsiō; see deride, -tion]
de•ris′i•ble (-ˈrɪz ə bəl) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.derision - contemptuous laughterderision - contemptuous laughter    
discourtesy, disrespect - an expression of lack of respect
jeer, jeering, mockery, scoff, scoffing - showing your contempt by derision
put-down, squelch, squelcher, takedown - a crushing remark
befooling, stultification - derision of someone or something as foolish or absurd or inconsistent
2.derision - the act of deriding or treating with contempt
offense, offensive activity, discourtesy, offence - a lack of politeness; a failure to show regard for others; wounding the feelings or others
mock - the act of mocking or ridiculing; "they made a mock of him"

derision

noun mockery, laughter, contempt, ridicule, scorn, insult, sneering, disdain, scoffing, disrespect, denigration, disparagement, contumely, raillery He tried to calm them but was greeted with shouts of derision.

derision

noun
Words or actions intended to evoke contemptuous laughter:
Translations
سُخْرِيَه، هُزْء
posměchvýsměch
hånspot
kigúnyoláskinevetéskicsúfolás
hæîni; hæînishlátur

derision

[dɪˈrɪʒən] Nmofa f, burla f, irrisión f
this was greeted with hoots of derisionesto fue recibido con gran mofa or sonoras burlas, esto provocó gran irrisión

derision

[dɪˈrɪʒən] ndérision f
with derision → avec dérision
to be greeted with derision (= ridiculed) → être accueilli(e) avec sarcasme

derision

nHohn m, → Spott m; object of derisionZielscheibe fdes Spotts; to be greeted with derisionspöttisch or mit Spott aufgenommen werden

derision

[dɪˈrɪʒn] nderisione f

deride

(diˈraid) verb
to laugh at; to mock.
derision (diˈriʒən) noun
mockery or laughter which shows scorn and contempt. His remarks were greeted with shouts of derision.
deˈrisive (-siv) adjective
1. mocking; showing scorn. derisive laughter.
2. causing or deserving scorn. The salary they offered me was derisive.
deˈrisory (-səri) adjective
ridiculous. His attempts were derisory.
References in classic literature ?
But the seaman of the last generation, brought into sympathy with the caravels of ancient time by his sailing-ship, their lineal descendant, cannot look upon those lumbering forms navigating the naive seas of ancient woodcuts without a feeling of surprise, of affectionate derision, envy, and admiration.
The only fame of my poem which reached me was when another boy in the office quoted some lines of it in derision.
But when I looked into the mirror, I shrieked, and my heart throbbed: for not myself did I see therein, but a devil's grimace and derision.
Had not Thwackum too much neglected virtue, and Square, religion, in the composition of their several systems, and had not both utterly discarded all natural goodness of heart, they had never been represented as the objects of derision in this history; in which we will now proceed.
Nina interpreted the stories about the creche fancifully, and in spite of our derision she cherished a belief that Christ was born in Bohemia a short time before the Shimerdas left that country.
Instead of it even-- as a woman reads another--she could see what I myself saw: his derision, his amusement, his contempt for the breakdown of my resignation at being left alone and for the fine machinery I had set in motion to attract his attention to my slighted charms.
It was a smile that had in it something both of pain and weakness--a haggard old man's smile; but there was, besides that, a grain of derision, a shadow of treachery, in his expression as he craftily watched, and watched, and watched me at my work.
The inhabitants shouted in derision when they saw the venerable form of the old chief justice.
For indeed, every sect of them, hath a diverse posture, or cringe by themselves, which cannot but move derision in worldlings, and depraved politics, who are apt to contemn holy things.
It was received with every possible variety of expressions of doubt, incredulity, and derision from every one, with the exception of J.
No one is obliged to discover either a planet, a comet, or a satellite; and whoever makes a mistake in such a case exposes himself justly to the derision of the mass.
But for answer they only yelled in derision and launched a couple of spears at me, both of which missed.