derivable


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de·rive

 (dĭ-rīv′)
v. de·rived, de·riv·ing, de·rives
v.tr.
1.
a. To obtain or receive from a source: a dance that is derived from the samba; confidence that is derived from years of experience.
b. Chemistry To produce or obtain (a compound) from another substance by chemical reaction.
2. Linguistics
a. To trace the origin or development of (a word).
b. To generate (a linguistic structure) from another structure or set of structures.
3. To arrive at by reasoning; deduce or infer: derive a conclusion from facts.
v.intr.
To be derived from a source; originate. See Synonyms at stem1.

[Middle English deriven, to be derived from, from Old French deriver, from Latin dērīvāre, to derive, draw off : dē-, de- + rīvus, stream; see rei- in Indo-European roots.]

de·riv′a·ble adj.
de·riv′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.derivable - capable of being derived
derived - formed or developed from something else; not original; "the belief that classes and organizations are secondary and derived"- John Dewey
Translations

derivable

adj (Ling, Philos, Chem) → ableitbar
References in classic literature ?
Since that time, scarcely a week has passed during seven whole years, without his hearing from me a repetition of the part I played in that manifestation, together with ample descriptions of all the phenomena in Spaceland, and the arguments for the existence of Solid things derivable from Analogy.
All that is necessary is that it should be derivable from the regular appearances by the laws which express the distorting influence of the medium.
He here confounds the pleasure derivable from sweet sounds with the capacity for creating them.
We have excellent authority," he remarked, "for the statement that a considerable amount of satisfaction is derivable from the exercise of that sentiment.
Whether his meditations were so intense as to be disturbed by the dog's winking, or whether his feelings were so wrought upon by his reflections that they required all the relief derivable from kicking an unoffending animal to allay them, is matter for argument and consideration.
Pickwick was fain to prepare for his Christmas visit to Dingley Dell, with the pleasant anticipation that some two or three months afterwards, an action brought against him for damages sustained by reason of a breach of promise of marriage, would be publicly tried in the Court of Common Pleas; the plaintiff having all the advantages derivable, not only from the force of circumstances, but from the sharp practice of Dodson & Fogg to boot.
To those who have cherished an affection for a faithful and sagacious dog, I need hardly be at the trouble of explaining the nature or the intensity of the gratification thus derivable.
Being naturally of a serious turn, my attention was directed to the solid advantages derivable from a residence here, rather than to the effervescent pleasures which are the grand object with too many visitants.
With these reflections, and a very hard knock on the crown of his unfortunate hat at each repetition of the last word, Newman Noggs, whose brain was a little muddled by so much of the contents of the pocket-pistol as had found their way there during his recent concealment, went forth to seek such consolation as might be derivable from the beef and greens of some cheap eating-house.
If, in his limited sphere, he sought power, it was the power of knowledge; the power derivable from a perfect comprehension of his business.
It should be such that the moral grounds that justify imputing it not be derivable from the grounds that justify imputing responsibility to the individual members.
This function controls the transition between linear regimes and, therefore, the Canonical PWL model inherits some properties from the absolute value function; it is continuous but not derivable along the boundaries.