derivation


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der·i·va·tion

 (dĕr′ə-vā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deriving.
b. The state or fact of being derived; origination: a custom of recent derivation.
c. Something derived; a derivative.
2. The form or source from which something is derived; an origin.
3. Linguistics
a. The historical origin and development of a word; an etymology.
b. The process by which words are formed from existing words or bases by adding affixes, as singer from sing or undo from do, by changing the shape of the word or base, as song from sing, or by adding an affix and changing the pronunciation of the word or base, as electricity from electric.
c. In generative linguistics, the generation of a linguistic structure through an ordered or partially ordered series of operations on other structures, such as the creation of a surface structure from a deep structure, or of a complex word from its morphological components.
d. The formal description of the process of such generation.
4. Logic & Mathematics A logical or mathematical process indicating through a sequence of statements that a result such as a theorem or a formula necessarily follows from the initial assumptions.

der′i·va′tion·al adj.

derivation

(ˌdɛrɪˈveɪʃən)
n
1. the act of deriving or state of being derived
2. (Linguistics) the source, origin, or descent of something, such as a word
3. something derived; a derivative
4. (Mathematics)
a. the process of deducing a mathematical theorem, formula, etc, as a necessary consequence of a set of accepted statements
b. this sequence of statements
c. the operation of finding a derivative
ˌderiˈvational adj

der•i•va•tion

(ˌdɛr əˈveɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of deriving or the state of being derived.
2. source; origin.
3. something derived.
4. development of a mathematical theorem.
5.
a. the process of adding affixes to or changing a base, thereby forming a word that may undergo further inflection or participate in different syntactic constructions, as in forming service from serve, song from sing, or hardness from hard (contrasted with inflection).
b. the systematic description of such processes in a language.
[1375–1425; < Latin]
der`i•va′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.derivation - the source or origin from which something derives (i.e. comes or issues); "he prefers shoes of Italian derivation"; "music of Turkish derivation"
origin, source, root, rootage, beginning - the place where something begins, where it springs into being; "the Italian beginning of the Renaissance"; "Jupiter was the origin of the radiation"; "Pittsburgh is the source of the Ohio River"; "communism's Russian root"
2.derivation - (historical linguistics) an explanation of the historical origins of a word or phrase
diachronic linguistics, diachrony, historical linguistics - the study of linguistic change; "the synchrony and diachrony of language"
explanation, account - a statement that makes something comprehensible by describing the relevant structure or operation or circumstances etc.; "the explanation was very simple"; "I expected a brief account"
3.derivation - a line of reasoning that shows how a conclusion follows logically from accepted propositions
illation, inference - the reasoning involved in drawing a conclusion or making a logical judgment on the basis of circumstantial evidence and prior conclusions rather than on the basis of direct observation
4.derivation - (descriptive linguistics) the process whereby new words are formed from existing words or bases by affixation; "`singer' from `sing' or `undo' from `do' are examples of derivations"
descriptive linguistics - a description (at a given point in time) of a language with respect to its phonology and morphology and syntax and semantics without value judgments
eponymy - the derivation of a general name from that of a famous person
linguistic process - a process involved in human language
5.derivation - inherited properties shared with others of your bloodlinederivation - inherited properties shared with others of your bloodline
hereditary pattern, inheritance - (genetics) attributes acquired via biological heredity from the parents
descent, extraction, origin - properties attributable to your ancestry; "he comes from good origins"
bloodline, pedigree - ancestry of a purebred animal
6.derivation - drawing of fluid or inflammation away from a diseased part of the body
drawing off, drawing - act of getting or draining something such as electricity or a liquid from a source; "the drawing of water from the well"
7.derivation - drawing off water from its main channel as for irrigation
drawing off, drawing - act of getting or draining something such as electricity or a liquid from a source; "the drawing of water from the well"
8.derivation - the act of deriving something or obtaining something from a source or origin
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen

derivation

noun origin, source, basis, beginning, root, foundation, descent, ancestry, genealogy, etymology The derivation of its name is obscure.

derivation

noun
Translations
إشْتِقاقأصْل
odvozovánípůvod
afledningherkomstoprindelseudledningudvinding
leszármaztatásszármaztatás
afleiîsla
odvodzovanie
kaynakkökentüre me

derivation

[ˌderɪˈveɪʃən] N [of word] → derivación f

derivation

[ˌdɛrɪˈveɪʃən] n [word] → dérivation f

derivation

nAbleitung f; (Chem) → Derivation f; this text has its derivation from Kafka’s novelsdieser Text basiert auf Kafkas Romanen; whatever the true derivation of this story may bewoher diese Geschichte auch immer ursprünglich stammt

derivation

[ˌdɛrɪˈveɪʃn] nderivazione f

derive

(diˈraiv) verb
(with from).
1. to come or develop from. The word `derives' is derived from an old French word.
2. to draw or take from (a source or origin). We derive comfort from his presence.
ˌderiˈvation (deri-) noun
1. the source or origin (of a word etc).
2. the process of deriving.
derivative (diˈrivətiv) adjective
derived from something else and not original.
noun
a word, substance etc formed from another word, substance etc. `Reader' is a derivative of `read'.

der·i·va·tion

n. derivación.
1. desviación, curso alterado o lateral que tiene lugar por anastomosis o por una característica anatómica natural;
2. descendencia.
References in classic literature ?
But I prefer the first, which, indeed, is the most probable derivation.
But I do not approve of this derivation, which seems to be a little strained.
The term is merely one of foreign derivation, meaning a clever fellow, or, in more literary and elegant language, a gentleman with whom one must reckon.
He professed to have received it at one or two removes from an eye-witness; but this derivation, together with the lapse of time, must have afforded opportunities for many variations of the narrative; so that despairing of literal and absolute truth, I have not scrupled to make such further changes as seemed conducive to the reader's profit and delight.
Touching the derivation of the name Vondervotteimittiss, I confess myself, with sorrow, equally at fault.
His name is a derivation of the Greek Simia -- what great fools are antiquarians
He had followed carefully the argument which established the derivation from Mr.
When I asked Chal-az for the Caspakian name for rope, he told me ga, and for the first time I understood the derivation of the word Galu, which means ropeman.
upon this derivation by the fact that the title was formerly
This word "arthurization" has long puzzled the etymologists, but its derivation, I hope, is now made clear.
In the first place attempts have been made to show that "Hesiod" is a significant name and therefore fictitious: it is only necessary to mention Goettling's derivation from IEMI to ODOS (which would make `Hesiod' mean the
is any mention made such as we find in the first book of Aristotle's Metaphysics, of the derivation of such a theory or of any part of it from the Pythagoreans, the Eleatics, the Heracleiteans, or even from Socrates.