derivative


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Related to derivative: Derivative market

de·riv·a·tive

 (dĭ-rĭv′ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Resulting from or employing derivation: a derivative word; a derivative process.
2. Copied or adapted from others: a highly derivative prose style.
n.
1. Something derived.
2. Linguistics A word formed from another by derivation, such as electricity from electric.
3. Mathematics
a. The limiting value of the ratio of the change in a function to the corresponding change in its independent variable.
b. The instantaneous rate of change of a function with respect to its variable.
c. The slope of the tangent line to the graph of a function at a given point. Also called differential coefficient, fluxion.
4. Chemistry A compound derived or obtained from another and containing essential elements of the parent substance.
5. A financial instrument that derives its value from another more fundamental asset, as a commitment to buy a bond for a certain sum on a certain date.

de·riv′a·tive·ly adv.

derivative

(dɪˈrɪvətɪv)
adj
1. resulting from derivation; derived
2. based on or making use of other sources; not original or primary
3. copied from others, esp slavishly; plagiaristic
n
4. a term, idea, etc, that is based on or derived from another in the same class
5. (Linguistics) a word derived from another word
6. (Chemistry) chem a compound that is formed from, or can be regarded as formed from, a structurally related compound: chloroform is a derivative of methane.
7. (Mathematics) maths
a. Also called: differential coefficient or first derivative the change of a function, f(x), with respect to an infinitesimally small change in the independent variable, x; the limit of [f(a + Δx)–f(a)]/Δx, at x = a, as the increment, Δx, tends to 0. Symbols: df(x)/dx, f′(x), Df(x): the derivative of xn is nxn–1.
b. the rate of change of one quantity with respect to another: velocity is the derivative of distance with respect to time.
8. (Banking & Finance) finance
a. (usually plural) a financial instrument, such as a futures contract or option, the price of which is largely determined by the commodity, currency, share price, interest rate, etc, to which it is linked
b. (as modifier): a derivatives trader.
9. (Psychoanalysis) psychoanal an activity that represents the expression of hidden impulses and desires by channelling them into socially acceptable forms
deˈrivatively adv

de•riv•a•tive

(dɪˈrɪv ə tɪv)

adj.
1. not original; secondary.
n.
2. something derived.
3. a word that has undergone derivation from another, as atomic from atom.
4. a chemical substance or compound obtained or regarded as derived from another.
5. Math. the instantaneous rate of change of one quantity in a function with respect to another.
6. a financial contract whose value derives from the value of underlying stocks, bonds, currencies, commodities, etc.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin]
de•riv′a•tive•ly, adv.
de•riv′a•tive•ness, n.

de·riv·a·tive

(dĭ-rĭv′ə-tĭv)
In calculus, the slope of the tangent line to a curve at a particular point on the curve. Since a curve represents a function, its derivative can also be thought of as the rate of change of the corresponding function at the given point. Derivatives are computed using differentiation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.derivative - the result of mathematical differentiation; the instantaneous change of one quantity relative to another; df(x)/dx
curvature - the rate of change (at a point) of the angle between a curve and a tangent to the curve
figuring, reckoning, calculation, computation - problem solving that involves numbers or quantities
partial, partial derivative - the derivative of a function of two or more variables with respect to a single variable while the other variables are considered to be constant
2.derivative - a compound obtained from, or regarded as derived from, another compound
chemical compound, compound - (chemistry) a substance formed by chemical union of two or more elements or ingredients in definite proportion by weight
3.derivative - a financial instrument whose value is based on another security
legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument - (law) a document that states some contractual relationship or grants some right
futures contract - an agreement to buy or sell a specific amount of a commodity or financial instrument at a particular price on a stipulated future date; the contract can be sold before the settlement date
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
option - the right to buy or sell property at an agreed price; the right is purchased and if it is not exercised by a stated date the money is forfeited
4.derivative - (linguistics) a word that is derived from another word; "`electricity' is a derivative of `electric'"
linguistics - the scientific study of language
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
Adj.1.derivative - resulting from or employing derivation; "a derivative process"; "a highly derivative prose style"
derived - formed or developed from something else; not original; "the belief that classes and organizations are secondary and derived"- John Dewey

derivative

noun
1. by-product, spin-off, offshoot, descendant, derivation, outgrowth a poppy-seed derivative similar to heroin

derivative

adjective
Stemming from an original source:
noun
Something derived from another:
Translations
كَلِمَه مُشْتَقَّهمُشْتَق من
odvozeninaodvozenýderivacederivátnepůvodní
afledningderivativefterlignetuoriginal
tuletis
derivaattajohdannainenjohdos
képzettleszármaztatottszármazékszó
afleidd mynd orîs/hlutar/fyrirbærisafleiddur
pochodna
derivada
odvodeninaodvodený
izpeljankaodvod
avledningderivatderivata
türemiştürev

derivative

[dɪˈrɪvətɪv]
A. ADJ (Chem, Ling) → derivado; (= unoriginal) [literary work, style] → poco original
B. N (Chem, Ling, Fin) → derivado m

derivative

[dɪˈrɪvətɪv]
n
(= thing derived from another) → dérivé m
a derivative of → un dérivé de
(FINANCE) (= financial instrument) → produit m dérivé
adj (= unoriginal) → peu original(e)

derivative

adjabgeleitet; (Ling, Chem) → abgeleitet, derivativ; (fig) style, composition, literary work etcnachgeahmt, imitiert; derivative markets (Fin) → Markt mfür Derivate; derivative products (Fin) → Derivate pl
n
Ableitung f; (Ling also, Chem) → Derivat nt
(Fin) → Derivat nt

derivative

[dɪˈrɪvətɪv]
1. adj (pej) (literary work, style) → poco originale
2. n (Chem, Ling) → derivato (Math) → derivata

derive

(diˈraiv) verb
(with from).
1. to come or develop from. The word `derives' is derived from an old French word.
2. to draw or take from (a source or origin). We derive comfort from his presence.
ˌderiˈvation (deri-) noun
1. the source or origin (of a word etc).
2. the process of deriving.
derivative (diˈrivətiv) adjective
derived from something else and not original.
noun
a word, substance etc formed from another word, substance etc. `Reader' is a derivative of `read'.

derivative

n derivado; petroleum — derivado del petróleo
References in classic literature ?
But in regard to the interfering acts of a superior and subordinate authority, of an original and derivative power, the nature and reason of the thing indicate the converse of that rule as proper to be followed.
They must be told that the ultimate authority, wherever the derivative may be found, resides in the people alone, and that it will not depend merely on the comparative ambition or address of the different governments, whether either, or which of them, will be able to enlarge its sphere of jurisdiction at the expense of the other.
There are some cases, however, in which, as the quality under consideration has no name, it is impossible that those possessed of it should have a name that is derivative.
This derivative, to say the truth, is still countenanced by some traces of the electric fluid evident on the summit of the steeple of the House of the Town-Council.
The movement is, properly speaking, a derivative from Nihilism--though they are only known indirectly, and by hearsay, for they never advertise their doings in the papers.
To follow that way is an initiation, by which they will become able to distinguish, in art, speech, feeling, manners, in men and life generally, what is genuine, animated, and expressive from what is only conventional and derivative, and therefore inexpressive.
I trust he does not read this, unless he will improve by it -- thinking to live by some derivative old-country mode in this primitive new country -- to catch perch with shiners.
It seems to me to be derivative, and to consist largely in BELIEFS: beliefs that what constitutes the thought is connected with various other elements which together make up the object.
The Idiots" is such an obviously derivative piece of work that it is impossible for me to say anything about it here.
Of late even the merest derivative of the word science (a term in itself inoffensive and of indefinite meaning) had the curious power of evoking a definitely offensive mental vision of Mr Vladimir, in his body as he lived, with an almost supernatural clearness.
Returning to France, I spent some months in a research into the coal-tar derivatives, which I conducted in a laboratory at Montpellier, in the south of France.
Of course, being left so much as I was to my own whim in such things, I could not keep a just mean; I had an aversion for the Latin derivatives which was nothing short of a craze.