derive


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Related to derive: drive

de·rive

 (dĭ-rīv′)
v. de·rived, de·riv·ing, de·rives
v.tr.
1.
a. To obtain or receive from a source: a dance that is derived from the samba; confidence that is derived from years of experience.
b. Chemistry To produce or obtain (a compound) from another substance by chemical reaction.
2. Linguistics
a. To trace the origin or development of (a word).
b. To generate (a linguistic structure) from another structure or set of structures.
3. To arrive at by reasoning; deduce or infer: derive a conclusion from facts.
v.intr.
To be derived from a source; originate. See Synonyms at stem1.

[Middle English deriven, to be derived from, from Old French deriver, from Latin dērīvāre, to derive, draw off : dē-, de- + rīvus, stream; see rei- in Indo-European roots.]

de·riv′a·ble adj.
de·riv′er n.

derive

(dɪˈraɪv)
vb
1. (usually foll by from) to draw or be drawn (from) in source or origin; trace or be traced
2. (tr) to deduce; infer
3. (tr) to trace the source or development of
4. (Chemistry) (usually foll by from) to produce or be produced (from) by a chemical reaction
5. (Mathematics) maths to obtain (a function) by applying a sequence of steps
[C14: from Old French deriver to spring from, from Latin dērīvāre to draw off, from de- + rīvus a stream]
deˈrivable adj
deˈriver n

de•rive

(dɪˈraɪv)

v. -rived, -riv•ing. v.t.
1. to receive or obtain from a source or origin (usu. fol. by from); gain; glean.
2. to trace from a source or origin.
3. to reach or obtain by reasoning; deduce; infer.
4. to produce or obtain (a chemical substance) from another.
v.i.
5. to come from a source or origin; originate (often fol. by from).
[1350–1400; < Old French deriver < Latin dērīvāre to lead off =dē- de- + -rīvāre, derivative of rīvus a stream, channel]
de•riv′a•ble, adj.
de•riv′er, n.

derive


Past participle: derived
Gerund: deriving

Imperative
derive
derive
Present
I derive
you derive
he/she/it derives
we derive
you derive
they derive
Preterite
I derived
you derived
he/she/it derived
we derived
you derived
they derived
Present Continuous
I am deriving
you are deriving
he/she/it is deriving
we are deriving
you are deriving
they are deriving
Present Perfect
I have derived
you have derived
he/she/it has derived
we have derived
you have derived
they have derived
Past Continuous
I was deriving
you were deriving
he/she/it was deriving
we were deriving
you were deriving
they were deriving
Past Perfect
I had derived
you had derived
he/she/it had derived
we had derived
you had derived
they had derived
Future
I will derive
you will derive
he/she/it will derive
we will derive
you will derive
they will derive
Future Perfect
I will have derived
you will have derived
he/she/it will have derived
we will have derived
you will have derived
they will have derived
Future Continuous
I will be deriving
you will be deriving
he/she/it will be deriving
we will be deriving
you will be deriving
they will be deriving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been deriving
you have been deriving
he/she/it has been deriving
we have been deriving
you have been deriving
they have been deriving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been deriving
you will have been deriving
he/she/it will have been deriving
we will have been deriving
you will have been deriving
they will have been deriving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been deriving
you had been deriving
he/she/it had been deriving
we had been deriving
you had been deriving
they had been deriving
Conditional
I would derive
you would derive
he/she/it would derive
we would derive
you would derive
they would derive
Past Conditional
I would have derived
you would have derived
he/she/it would have derived
we would have derived
you would have derived
they would have derived
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.derive - reason by deduction; establish by deduction
logical system, system of logic, logic - a system of reasoning
extrapolate - gain knowledge of (an area not known or experienced) by extrapolating
conclude, reason, reason out - decide by reasoning; draw or come to a conclusion; "We reasoned that it was cheaper to rent than to buy a house"
surmise - infer from incomplete evidence
elicit - derive by reason; "elicit a solution"
2.derive - obtain; "derive pleasure from one's garden"
obtain - come into possession of; "How did you obtain the visa?"
draw, reap - get or derive; "He drew great benefits from his membership in the association"
3.derive - come from; "The present name derives from an older form"
evolve - undergo development or evolution; "Modern man evolved a long time ago"
descend, derive, come - come from; be connected by a relationship of blood, for example; "She was descended from an old Italian noble family"; "he comes from humble origins"
4.derive - develop or evolve from a latent or potential state
etymologise, etymologize - give the etymology or derivation or suggest an etymology (for a word); "The linguist probably etymologized the words incorrectly"; "Although he is not trained in this, his hobby is etymologizing"
create, make - make or cause to be or to become; "make a mess in one's office"; "create a furor"
5.derive - come from; be connected by a relationship of blood, for example; "She was descended from an old Italian noble family"; "he comes from humble origins"
derive - come from; "The present name derives from an older form"
hail, come - be a native of; "She hails from Kalamazoo"

derive

verb obtain, get, receive, draw, gain, collect, gather, extract, elicit, glean, procure He is one of those people who derives pleasure from helping others.
derive from something come from, stem from, arise from, flow from, spring from, emanate from, proceed from, descend from, issue from, originate from The word Druid may derive from `drus', meaning `oak tree'.

derive

verb
1. To have as a source:
2. To obtain from another source:
3. To have hereditary derivation:
Idiom: trace one's descent.
4. To arrive at through reasoning:
Translations
يَسْتَمِديُشْتَق من
mítodvoditodvodit zpocházet zzískávat z
komme frastamme fraudvinde
tuletama
johtaapäätellä
fá, öîlastvera dregiî af
būti kilusiamdarinysišvestinissemtissusidarymas
atvasinātgūtizceltiesmantot
maťodvodiť

derive

[dɪˈraɪv]
A. VT [+ comfort, pleasure] → encontrar (from en) [+ profit] → sacar, obtener (from de) it derives its name or its name is derived from the Latin word "linum"su nombre viene or procede del latín "linum"
derived demanddemanda f indirecta
B. VI to derive from [word, name] → proceder de, venir de; [view, notion] → basarse en; [problem, power, fortune] → provenir de

derive

[dɪˈraɪv]
vt
(= get) to derive sth from [+ pleasure, benefit] → tirer qch de
to derive sth from doing sth [+ benefit, pleasure, satisfaction] → trouver qch dans le fait de faire qch
to be derived from [word] → être dérivé(e) de
vi (= come) to derive from [word] → dériver de; [wealth, power, feeling] → provenir de

derive

vt idea, name, originsher- or ableiten (from von); profit, benefitziehen (from aus); satisfaction, comfort, pleasure, energygewinnen (from aus); incomebeziehen (from aus); this word is derived from the Greekdieses Wort stammt aus dem Griechischen
vi to derive fromsich her- or ableiten von; (power, fortune)beruhen auf (+dat), → herkommen or -rühren von; (ideas)kommen or stammen von; this derives from the fact that …das beruht auf der Tatsache, dass …

derive

[dɪˈraɪv]
1. vt to derive (from) (profit, comfort, pleasure) → ricavare (da), trarre (da); (name) → derivare (da); (origins) → trarre (da)
2. vi to derive from (subj, word, language) → derivare da; (power, fortune) → provenire da

derive

(diˈraiv) verb
(with from).
1. to come or develop from. The word `derives' is derived from an old French word.
2. to draw or take from (a source or origin). We derive comfort from his presence.
ˌderiˈvation (deri-) noun
1. the source or origin (of a word etc).
2. the process of deriving.
derivative (diˈrivətiv) adjective
derived from something else and not original.
noun
a word, substance etc formed from another word, substance etc. `Reader' is a derivative of `read'.

derive

v. derivar, inferir, deducir; descender, proceder.
References in classic literature ?
Dispositions more boldly speculative may derive a stern enjoyment from the discovery, since there must be evil in the world, that a high man is as likely to grasp his share of it as a low one.
So forcibly did he dwell upon this symbol, for the hour or more during which his periods were rolling over the people's heads, that it assumed new terrors in their imagination, and seemed to derive its scarlet hue from the flames of the infernal pit.
Now, if to this consideration you superadd the official supremacy of a ship-master, then, by inference, you will derive the cause of that peculiarity of sea-life just mentioned.
Don't you tell us all, once a year, that governments derive their just power from the consent of the governed?
Some, however, would derive the word from sans terre without land or a home, which, therefore, in the good sense, will mean, having no particular home, but equally at home everywhere.
Rochester's arms--it could not derive warmth from his breast.
Subsequent communications announced his departure, under care of a trustworthy foreman, for some public works in Belgium; touched on the general benefit he appeared to derive from this new change; praised his excellent manners and address, which were of great assistance in facilitating business communications with the foreigners -- and passed over in ominous silence the main question of his actual progress in the acquirement of knowledge.