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v. de·rived, de·riv·ing, de·rives
a. To obtain or receive from a source: a dance that is derived from the samba; confidence that is derived from years of experience.
b. Chemistry To produce or obtain (a compound) from another substance by chemical reaction.
2. Linguistics
a. To trace the origin or development of (a word).
b. To generate (a linguistic structure) from another structure or set of structures.
3. To arrive at by reasoning; deduce or infer: derive a conclusion from facts.
To be derived from a source; originate. See Synonyms at stem1.

[Middle English deriven, to be derived from, from Old French deriver, from Latin dērīvāre, to derive, draw off : dē-, de- + rīvus, stream; see rei- in Indo-European roots.]

de·riv′a·ble adj.
de·riv′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.derived - formed or developed from something else; not original; "the belief that classes and organizations are secondary and derived"- John Dewey
underived - not derived; primary or simple


Stemming from an original source:
References in classic literature ?
He greatly valued his possessions, chiefly because they were his, and derived genuine pleasure from contemplating a painting, a statuette, a rare lace curtain--no matter what--after he had bought it and placed it among his household gods.
The instant David discovered that he battled with a disputant who imbibed his faith from the lights of nature, eschewing all subtleties of doctrine, he willingly abandoned a controversy from which he believed neither profit nor credit was to be derived.
Our acquaintance with the whole subject is derived chiefly from tradition.
Some centuries ago, when the Sperm whale was almost wholly unknown in his own proper individuality, and when his oil was only accidentally obtained from the stranded fish; in those days spermaceti, it would seem, was popularly supposed to be derived from a creature identical with the one then known in England as the Greenland or Right Whale.
Akin to the adventure of Perseus and Andromeda --indeed, by some supposed to be indirectly derived from it --is that famous story of St.
From the same source was derived the character of the planter Legree.
There will never be a really free and enlightened State until the State comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived, and treats him accordingly.
I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking, that is, of taking walks--who had a genius, so to speak, for SAUNTERING, which word is beautifully derived "from idle people who roved about the country, in the Middle Ages, and asked charity, under pretense of going a la Sainte Terre," to the Holy Land, till the children exclaimed, "There goes a Sainte-Terrer," a Saunterer, a Holy-Lander.
Their present distance from the cliffs from which they were derived is about 420,000 feet, and if we assume that they traveled at the rate of 400 feet per annum, their journey must have occupied them no less than 1,055 years
He very much feared that Miss Fairfax derived more evil than good from them.
Colonel Brandon, who had a general invitation to the house, was with them almost every day; he came to look at Marianne and talk to Elinor, who often derived more satisfaction from conversing with him than from any other daily occurrence, but who saw at the same time with much concern his continued regard for her sister.
as it was, I derived from both a strange excitement, and reckless and feverish, I wished the wind to howl more wildly, the gloom to deepen to darkness, and the confusion to rise to clamour.