derived


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de·rive

 (dĭ-rīv′)
v. de·rived, de·riv·ing, de·rives
v.tr.
1.
a. To obtain or receive from a source: a dance that is derived from the samba; confidence that is derived from years of experience.
b. Chemistry To produce or obtain (a compound) from another substance by chemical reaction.
2. Linguistics
a. To trace the origin or development of (a word).
b. To generate (a linguistic structure) from another structure or set of structures.
3. To arrive at by reasoning; deduce or infer: derive a conclusion from facts.
v.intr.
To be derived from a source; originate. See Synonyms at stem1.

[Middle English deriven, to be derived from, from Old French deriver, from Latin dērīvāre, to derive, draw off : dē-, de- + rīvus, stream; see rei- in Indo-European roots.]

de·riv′a·ble adj.
de·riv′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.derived - formed or developed from something else; not original; "the belief that classes and organizations are secondary and derived"- John Dewey
underived - not derived; primary or simple

derived

adjective
Stemming from an original source:
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Very little assistance to the State could be derived from the epistolary intercourse of Mrs.
I cannot in any case agree with Keiss that my whole conception of the external world has been derived from perceptions.
Yes, but they--Wurt, and Knaust, and Pripasov--would answer that your consciousness of existence is derived from the conjunction of all your sensations, that that consciousness of existence is the result of your sensations.
Of course, he never had the benefit of a whaling voyage (such men seldom have), but whence he derived that picture, who can tell?
Akin to the adventure of Perseus and Andromeda --indeed, by some supposed to be indirectly derived from it --is that famous story of St.
It mattered not whether my impressions were derived through organs called ears, and were communicated by others called those of speech, or whether each function was performed by means of sensations and agencies too subtle to be detected by ordinary means.
If this great bed of pebbles, without including the mud necessarily derived from their attrition, was piled into a mound, it would form a great mountain chain
Mat treated the objection with great contempt, and averred in reply, that he made the slaves black in order to obtain a striking effect of contrast, and that, could he have derived a similar advantage from making his heroine blue, blue she should have been.
The popular account of them is partly derived from one or two passages in his Dialogues interpreted without regard to their poetical environment.
The reasons which I shall give against this theory will be mainly derived from previous authors.
Hesiod's diction is in the main Homeric, but one of his charms is the use of quaint allusive phrases derived, perhaps, from a pre- Hesiodic peasant poetry: thus the season when Boreas blows is the time when `the Boneless One gnaws his foot by his fireless hearth in his cheerless house'; to cut one's nails is `to sever the withered from the quick upon that which has five branches'; similarly the burglar is the `day-sleeper', and the serpent is the `hairless one'.
THE United Netherlands are a confederacy of republics, or rather of aristocracies of a very remarkable texture, yet confirming all the lessons derived from those which we have already reviewed.