deriving


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de·rive

 (dĭ-rīv′)
v. de·rived, de·riv·ing, de·rives
v.tr.
1.
a. To obtain or receive from a source: a dance that is derived from the samba; confidence that is derived from years of experience.
b. Chemistry To produce or obtain (a compound) from another substance by chemical reaction.
2. Linguistics
a. To trace the origin or development of (a word).
b. To generate (a linguistic structure) from another structure or set of structures.
3. To arrive at by reasoning; deduce or infer: derive a conclusion from facts.
v.intr.
To be derived from a source; originate. See Synonyms at stem1.

[Middle English deriven, to be derived from, from Old French deriver, from Latin dērīvāre, to derive, draw off : dē-, de- + rīvus, stream; see rei- in Indo-European roots.]

de·riv′a·ble adj.
de·riv′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deriving - (historical linguistics) an explanation of the historical origins of a word or phrase
diachronic linguistics, diachrony, historical linguistics - the study of linguistic change; "the synchrony and diachrony of language"
explanation, account - a statement that makes something comprehensible by describing the relevant structure or operation or circumstances etc.; "the explanation was very simple"; "I expected a brief account"
References in classic literature ?
While exclaiming loudly against duels and brawls, they excited them secretly to quarrel, deriving an immoderate satisfaction or genuine regret from the success or defeat of their own combatants.
In no instance, let us say, was this worthy gentleman accused of deriving personal advantage from the cooperation of his minions.
The Notice provides that this rule is based on the contract manufacturer's not deriving its gross receipts from the sale or other disposition of the QPP.