descended


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de·scend

 (dĭ-sĕnd′)
v. de·scend·ed, de·scend·ing, de·scends
v.intr.
1. To move from a higher to a lower place; come or go down.
2. To slope, extend, or incline downward: "A rough path descended like a steep stair into the plain" (J.R.R. Tolkien).
3.
a. To be related by genetic descent from an individual or individuals in a previous generation: He descends from Norwegian immigrants.
b. To come down from a source; derive: a tradition descending from colonial days.
c. To pass by inheritance: The house has descended through four generations.
4. To lower oneself; stoop: "She, the conqueror, had descended to the level of the conquered" (James Bryce).
5. To proceed or progress downward, as in rank, pitch, or scale: titles listed in descending order of importance; notes that descended to the lower register.
6. To arrive or attack in a sudden or overwhelming manner: summer tourists descending on the seashore village.
v.tr.
1. To move from a higher to lower part of; go down: I descended the staircase into the basement.
2. To extend or proceed downward along: a road that descended the mountain in sharp curves.
Idiom:
be descended from
To be related to (an ancestor) by genetic descent from an individual or individuals in a previous generation: She claims to be descended from European royalty.

[Middle English descenden, from Old French descendre, from Latin dēscendere : dē-, de- + scandere, to climb; see skand- in Indo-European roots.]

de·scend′i·ble, de·scend′a·ble adj.

descended

(dɪˈsɛndɪd)
adj
1. (Genetics) (foll by: from) connected by a blood relationship (to a dead or extinct individual, race, species, etc): descended from some Scottish lord.
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) (foll by: from) connected by a blood relationship (to a dead or extinct individual, race, species, etc): descended from some Scottish lord.
Translations

descended

[dɪˈsɛndɪd] adj [person] to be descended from sb (= a descendant of) → descendre de qn
to be descended from sth [animal] → descendre de qch
References in classic literature ?
La Esmeralda turned pale and descended from the pillory, staggering as she went.
Part of the Russian force had already descended into the valley toward the ponds and lakes and part were leaving these Pratzen Heights which he intended to attack and regarded as the key to the position.
Then he descended with cautious and slow step, for he dreaded lest an accident similar to that he had so adroitly feigned should happen in reality.
When we attempt to estimate the amount of structural difference between the domestic races of the same species, we are soon involved in doubt, from not knowing whether they have descended from one or several parent-species.
The next figure was of milder aspect, yet full of dignity, wearing a broad ruff, over which descended a beard, a gown of wrought velvet, and a doublet and hose of black satin.
I suggested to Hudson that we should attach a rope to the rocks on our arrival at the difficult bit, and hold it as we descended, as an additional protection.
The rain descended in such torrents that our poor shelter proved a mere mockery.
When the parlourmaid came he could not see her face; the brown rain had descended suddenly.
He ended, and the Son gave signal high To the bright Minister that watchd, hee blew His Trumpet, heard in OREB since perhaps When God descended, and perhaps once more To sound at general Doom.
His first idea was that they were Indians; he soon discovered, however, that they were white men, and, by the long line of pack-horses, ascertained them to be the convoy of Campbell, which, having descended the Sweet Water, was now on its way to the Horn River.
As he descended, the more timid ones scurried for their caves.
Presently a breeze dissipated the cloud, and I descended upon the glacier.