descent


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de·scent

 (dĭ-sĕnt′)
n.
1. The act or an instance of descending: the slow descent of the scuba divers.
2.
a. A way down: fashioned a descent with an ice axe.
b. A downward incline or passage; a slope: watched the stones roll down the descent.
3. Hereditary derivation; lineage: a person of African descent.
4. The fact or process of being derived or developing from a source: a paper tracing the descent of the novel from old picaresque tales.
5. Law Transmission of property, especially real estate, to a hereditary heir by an intestate owner.
6. A lowering or decline, as in status or level: Her career went into a rapid descent after the charges of misconduct.
7. A sudden visit or attack; an onslaught: the descent of the marauders on the settlement.

[Middle English, from Old French, descent, from feminine past participle of descendre, to descend; see descend.]

descent

(dɪˈsɛnt)
n
1. the act of descending
2. a downward slope or inclination
3. a passage, path, or way leading downwards
4. (Anthropology & Ethnology) derivation from an ancestor or ancestral group; lineage
5. (Anthropology & Ethnology) (in genealogy) a generation in a particular lineage
6. a decline or degeneration
7. a movement or passage in degree or state from higher to lower
8. (often foll by on) a sudden and overwhelming arrival or attack
9. (Law) property law (formerly) the transmission of real property to the heir on an intestacy

de•scent

(dɪˈsɛnt)

n.
1. the act, process, or fact of descending.
2. a downward inclination or slope.
3. a passage or stairway leading down.
4. derivation from an ancestor; lineage; extraction.
5. any passing from higher to lower in degree or state; decline.
6. a sudden raid or hostile attack.
7. transmission of real property by intestate succession.
[1300–50; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French descente, derivative of descendre to descend]

Descent

 of woodpeckers: a flock of woodpeckers—Lipton, 1970; also descendants collectively.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.descent - a movement downwarddescent - a movement downward      
change of location, travel - a movement through space that changes the location of something
drop, fall - a free and rapid descent by the force of gravity; "it was a miracle that he survived the drop from that height"
lightening - descent of the uterus into the pelvic cavity that occurs late in pregnancy; the fetus is said to have dropped
set - the descent of a heavenly body below the horizon; "before the set of sun"
cascade, shower - a sudden downpour (as of tears or sparks etc) likened to a rain shower; "a little shower of rose petals"; "a sudden cascade of sparks"
sinking - a descent as through liquid (especially through water); "they still talk about the sinking of the Titanic"
slide - (geology) the descent of a large mass of earth or rocks or snow etc.
2.descent - properties attributable to your ancestry; "he comes from good origins"
ancestry, filiation, lineage, derivation - inherited properties shared with others of your bloodline
full blood - descent from parents both of one pure breed
3.descent - the act of changing your location in a downward direction
movement, move, motion - the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path"
parachuting, jump - descent with a parachute; "he had done a lot of parachuting in the army"
nose dive, nosedive, dive - a steep nose-down descent by an aircraft
abseil, rappel - (mountaineering) a descent of a vertical cliff or wall made by using a doubled rope that is fixed to a higher point and wrapped around the body
swoop - a swift descent through the air
crash dive - a rapid descent by a submarine
drop - the act of dropping something; "they expected the drop would be successful"
collapse, flop - the act of throwing yourself down; "he landed on the bed with a great flop"
4.descent - the kinship relation between an individual and the individual's progenitors
family relationship, kinship, relationship - (anthropology) relatedness or connection by blood or marriage or adoption
bilateral descent - line of descent traced through both the maternal and paternal sides of the family
unilateral descent - line of descent traced through one side of the family
5.descent - a downward slope or bend
downhill - the downward slope of a hill
incline, slope, side - an elevated geological formation; "he climbed the steep slope"; "the house was built on the side of a mountain"
steep - a steep place (as on a hill)
acclivity, ascent, climb, upgrade, raise, rise - an upward slope or grade (as in a road); "the car couldn't make it up the rise"
6.descent - the descendants of one individualdescent - the descendants of one individual; "his entire lineage has been warriors"
kinfolk, kinsfolk, phratry, family line, sept, folk, family - people descended from a common ancestor; "his family has lived in Massachusetts since the Mayflower"
side - a family line of descent; "he gets his brains from his father's side"
family tree, genealogy - successive generations of kin

descent

noun
1. fall, drop, plunge, coming down, swoop The airplane crashed on its descent into the airport.
2. slope, drop, dip, incline, slant, declination, declivity On the descents, cyclists freewheel past cars.
3. decline, deterioration, degradation, decadence, degeneration, debasement his swift descent from respected academic to homeless derelict
4. origin, extraction, ancestry, lineage, family tree, parentage, heredity, genealogy, derivation All the contributors were of foreign descent.

descent

noun
1. The act of dropping from a height:
2. A downward slope or distance:
3. One's ancestors or their character or one's ancestral derivation:
4. A sudden drop to a lower condition or status:
5. A usually swift downward trend, as in prices:
Translations
أصْل، نَسَب، سُلالَهإنْحِدارمُنْحَدَر
původsestupspádsvahpád
afstamningnedstigningskrænt
syntyperä
nagibobronakpadpadinapodrijetlo
ætternibrekkaniîurferî, niîurkoma
zostup
spust
atabayır inişinişsoy

descent

[dɪˈsent] N
1. (= going down) → descenso m, bajada f; (= slope) → cuesta f, pendiente f; (= fall) → descenso m (in de)
2. (= raid) → ataque m (on sobre) → incursión f (on en)
3. (= ancestry) → ascendencia f (from de) of Italian descentde ascendencia italiana
line of descentlinaje m
he claimed descent from Peter the Greatafirmaba descender de Pedro el Grande

descent

[dɪˈsɛnt] n
(= journey down) → descente f
[plane] → descente f
on its descent → dans sa descente
to make its descent → entamer sa descente
(= origin) → origine f
to be of European descent → être d'origine européenne

descent

n
(= going down, of person) → Hinuntergehen nt, → Absteigen nt; (from mountain, of plane, into underworld) → Abstieg m; (of gymnast)Abgang m; (= slope: of road) → Abfall m; during the descent of the mountainwährend des Abstiegs vom Berg; the road made a sharp descentdie Straße fiel steil ab; descent by parachuteFallschirmabsprung m; the descent from the cross (Art, Rel) → die Kreuzabnahme
(= ancestry)Abstammung f, → Herkunft f; of noble descentvon adliger Abstammung or Herkunft; he claims direct descent from …er behauptet, direkt von … abzustammen
(of property)Vererbung f, → Übertragung f (→ to auf +acc); (of customs)Überlieferung f (→ to auf +acc)
(Mil, fig, = attack) → Überfall m (→ on auf +acc)
(inf: = visit) → Überfall m (inf)
(fig, into crime etc) → Absinken nt (→ into in +acc); (into chaos, civil war, madness) → Versinken nt (→ into in +acc)

descent

[dɪˈsɛnt] n (going down) → discesa; (ancestry) descent (from)discendenza (da)origine f (da)

descend

(diˈsend) verb
1. to go or climb down from a higher place or position. He descended the staircase.
2. to slope downwards. The hills descend to the sea.
3. (with on) to make a sudden attack on. The soldiers descended on the helpless villagers.
deˈscendant noun
the child, grandchild, great-grandchild etc of a person. This is a photograph of my grandmother with all her descendants.
deˈscent (-t) noun
1. the act of descending. The descent of the hill was quickly completed.
2. a slope. That is a steep descent.
3. family; ancestry. She is of royal descent.
be descended from
to be a descendant of.

the noun descendant ends in -ant (not -ent).

de·scent

n. descenso, bajada; descendencia, sucesión.
References in classic literature ?
The delivery of these skillful rhymes was accompanied, on the part of the stranger, by a regular rise and fall of his right hand, which terminated at the descent, by suffering the fingers to dwell a moment on the leaves of the little volume; and on the ascent, by such a flourish of the member as none but the initiated may ever hope to imitate.
Six hours later, when the shadow of Devil's Spur had crossed the river, and spread a slight coolness over the flat beyond, the Pioneer coach, leaving the summit, began also to bathe its heated bulk in the long shadows of the descent.
To find the born and educated lady, on the other hand, we need look no farther than Hepzibah, our forlorn old maid, in her rustling and rusty silks, with her deeply cherished and ridiculous consciousness of long descent, her shadowy claims to princely territory, and, in the way of accomplishment, her recollections, it may be, of having formerly thrummed on a harpsichord, and walked a minuet, and worked an antique tapestry-stitch on her sampler.
God, as a direct consequence of the sin which man thus punished, had given her a lovely child, whose place was on that same dishonoured bosom, to connect her parent for ever with the race and descent of mortals, and to be finally a blessed soul in heaven
The chief mate of the Pequod was Starbuck, a native of Nantucket, and a Quaker by descent.
Next instant, the luckless mate, so full of furious life, was smitten bodily into the air, and making a long arc in his descent, fell into the sea at the distance of about fifty yards.
After riding about an hour in this way, the whole party made a precipitate and tumultuous descent into a barn-yard belonging to a large farming establishment.
Here I was, a giant among pig- mies, a man among children, a master intelligence among intellectual moles: by all rational measurement the one and only actually great man in that whole British world; and yet there and then, just as in the remote England of my birth-time, the sheep-witted earl who could claim long descent from a king's leman, acquired at second-hand from the slums of London, was a better man than I was.
No student can belong to it who cannot show three full generations of noble descent.
Pembroke Howard, lawyer and bachelor, aged almost forty, was another old Virginian grandee with proved descent from the First Families.
By-and- by the procession went filing down the steep descent of the main avenue, the flickering rank of lights dimly revealing the lofty walls of rock almost to their point of junction sixty feet overhead.
It may, perhaps, be fairly questioned, whether any other portion of the population of the earth could have endured the privations, sufferings and horrors of slavery, without having become more degraded in the scale of humanity than the slaves of African descent.