descriptivist


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

de·scrip·tiv·ism

 (dĭ-skrĭp′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
The practice or application of descriptive linguistics, especially in the analysis of grammar.

de·scrip′tiv·ist adj. & n.
Translations

descriptivist

[dɪsˈkrɪptɪvɪst] Ndescriptivista mf

descriptivist

(Ling, Philos)
nDeskriptivist(in) m(f)
adjdeskriptivistisch
References in periodicals archive ?
For defenses of what I call the descriptivist view, see
Section 1 explains why the non-naturalists cannot rely on basic descriptivist or Fregean metasemantic accounts as a response to the previous challenges.
This favors a descriptivist position in metaethics--normative predicates have descriptive content--and disfavors a purely nondescriptivist position, like pure expressivism.
Yet Chambers (following Collier's lead) set an oddly prescriptivist tone in his contribution to this descriptivist project.
Lindsay's distorted and harmful ideas of race should be read alongside and as an accompanying frame to his crucial intervention into the revival of a performed poetry, just as contemporary, descriptivist understandings of linguistics find Greet's contributions both problematic and significant.
Although descriptivist approaches do make reference to exocentric combinations, these are typically more superficial than the detailed classifications of endocentric compounds (see, for example, Jespersen 1954; Adams 1973).
The problem with such binarisms is not so much the ingrained structuralist fear that the formalist and descriptivist paradigm will inevitably be polluted by the invasion of ethical and ideological concerns, as the failure of such rigid distinctions to do justice to the aims and complexities of textual analysis, interpretation, and cultural history.
Vitriolic language appears in the descriptivist camp, as well.
Epistemology and truth claims, in turn, were to be constructed according to the descriptivist theories of language first proposed by Gottlob Frege and Bertrand Russell and then developed further by such figures as Anthony Flew and R.
My point as an argumentative descriptivist is that understanding arguments and, yes, assessing and appraising them, needs to go beyond deductive correctness and include both actual argument standards applied by real people and argument assessment related to the forms of argument used.
While Puhvel's etymological dictionary does not have the same descriptivist goals as the CHD, it would be desirable to see it take some cues on presentation from its competitors.
Some of these figures line up in the prescriptivist (or tradition-minded) and others in the descriptivist (or change-accepting) trenches.