desertion


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de·ser·tion

 (dĭ-zûr′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of deserting.
b. The state of being deserted.
2. Law
a. Willful abandonment of a spouse or child owed a duty of support.
b. The willful, permanent separation of one spouse from the other without acceptable cause or the other's consent, considered as a ground for divorce.

desertion

(dɪˈzɜːʃən)
n
1. (Military) the act of deserting or abandoning or the state of being deserted or abandoned
2. (Law) law wilful abandonment, esp of one's spouse or children, without consent and in breach of obligations

de•ser•tion

(dɪˈzɜr ʃən)

n.
1. the act of deserting or the state of being deserted.
2. willful abandonment of a spouse, dependent children, etc., in violation of legal or moral obligations.
[1585–95; < Latin dēsertiō=dēser(ere) (see desert1) + -tiō -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.desertion - withdrawing support or help despite allegiance or responsibilitydesertion - withdrawing support or help despite allegiance or responsibility; "his abandonment of his wife and children left them penniless"
withdrawal - the act of withdrawing; "the withdrawal of French troops from Vietnam"
abscondment, decampment - the act of running away secretly (as to avoid arrest)
absence without leave, unauthorized absence - unauthorized military absence
deviationism - ideological defection from the party line (especially from orthodox communism)
2.desertion - the act of giving something updesertion - the act of giving something up  
rejection - the act of rejecting something; "his proposals were met with rejection"
exposure - abandoning without shelter or protection (as by leaving as infant out in the open)
apostasy, tergiversation - the act of abandoning a party for cause
bolt - a sudden abandonment (as from a political party)

desertion

noun
1. abandonment, betrayal, forsaking, dereliction, relinquishment It was a long time since she'd referred to her father's desertion of them.
2. defection, betrayal, reneging, repudiation, apostasy, relinquishment, abjuration mass desertion by the electorate
3. absconding, flight, escape (informal), running away, evasion, defection, truancy, decamping, dereliction, going AWOL, taking French leave The high rate of desertion has added to the army's woes.

desertion

noun
The act of forsaking:
Translations
هَجْر، تَرْك
zběhnutí
deserteringflugt
dezertálás
liîhlaup
dezercia
bırakıp gitmeterk etme

desertion

[dɪˈzɜːʃən] N (Mil) → deserción f; [of spouse] → abandono m

desertion

[dɪˈzɜːrʃən] n
(by soldier)désertion f
(by husband)abandon m
on grounds of desertion (LAW)pour abandon du domicile conjugaldesert island [ˌdɛzərtˈaɪlənd] nîle f déserte

desertion

n
(= act)Verlassen nt; (Jur: of wife, family) → böswilliges Verlassen; (Mil) → Desertion f, → Fahnenflucht f; (fig)Fahnenflucht f; desertion to the enemyÜberlaufen ntzum Feind
(= state)Verlassenheit f

desertion

[dɪˈzɜːʃn] n (Mil) → diserzione f; (of spouse) → abbandono del tetto coniugale

desert1

(diˈzəːt) verb
1. to go away from and leave without help etc; to leave or abandon. Why did you desert us?
2. to run away, usually from the army. He was shot for trying to desert.
deˈserted adjective
1. with no people etc. The streets are completely deserted.
2. abandoned. his deserted wife and children.
deˈserter noun
a man who deserts from the army etc.
deˈsertion (-ʃən) noun
(an) act of deserting.
References in classic literature ?
Damon, the morning of the eighth day after their desertion by the faithless Jacinto.
He was entrusted to me by my brother on his dying bed, and I have indulged him to his hurt, instead of training him up severely, and making a man of him, I have violated my trust, and I must not add the sin of desertion to that.
As a result of her desertion, two infants who relied upon her to prompt them (she knew the verses of all the children better than they did themselves) broke down ignominiously.
She felt the loss of Willoughby's character yet more heavily than she had felt the loss of his heart; his seduction and desertion of Miss Williams, the misery of that poor girl, and the doubt of what his designs might ONCE have been on herself, preyed altogether so much on her spirits, that she could not bring herself to speak of what she felt even to Elinor; and, brooding over her sorrows in silence, gave more pain to her sister than could have been communicated by the most open and most frequent confession of them.
It was the strain of a forsaken lady, who, after bewailing the perfidy of her lover, calls pride to her aid; desires her attendant to deck her in her brightest jewels and richest robes, and resolves to meet the false one that night at a ball, and prove to him, by the gaiety of her demeanour, how little his desertion has affected her.
He's as bitter as gall at your desertion and its consequences: don't expect thanks for this noble devotion.
The assertion of her natural rights and her sister's, sanctioned by the direct expression of her father's last wishes; the recall of Frank from China; the justification of her desertion of Norah -- all hung on her desperate purpose of recovering the lost inheritance, at any risk, from the man who had beggared and insulted his brother's children.
As they neared the end of her voyage, and her intense protest against desertion remained, as she thought, only half expressed, her sense of injury grew almost unbearable.
These poor lads have chosen me cap'n, after your desertion, sir"-- laying a particular emphasis upon the word "desertion.
Besides, he is not so overwise as to imagine that he knows whether death is a good or an evil; and he is certain that desertion of his duty is an evil.
The next day, 10th of November, the same desertion, the same solitude.
Abruptly the cruelty of this desertion became clear to me.