desiderative


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de·sid·er·a·tive

 (dĭ-sĭd′ər-ə-tĭv, -ə-rā′-, -zĭd′-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or expressing desire.
2. Grammar Designating a clause, a sentence, or in some languages an inflected verb form that expresses desire.

desiderative

(dɪˈzɪdərətɪv)
adj
1. feeling or expressing desire
2. (Grammar) (in certain languages, of a verb) related in form to another verb and expressing the subject's desire or intention to perform the act denoted by the other verb
n
(Grammar) a desiderative verb

desiderative

Used to describe a sentence, clause, or verb form that expresses a desire.
References in periodicals archive ?
In appraisal theory, a grammatical distinction is constructed between desiderative future or intended versus experienced emotive mental processes.
I now move on from these spurious examples of transitive nominals to the clearest categories attested in Old Avestan, the desiderative adjectives and superlatives, before considering more problematic categories.
Furthermore, they are able to manage an emotional and desiderative balance that avoids the mental consequences of repression, denial, anxieties, fears, and other excesses.
the weak da in the past tense 2Pl forms with the strong da in 2Pl possessive forms, or the strong ge in the comitative with the weak ze in the 3Pl form of the desiderative mood.
Santideva's term is jighatsita, a desiderative from Vghas "eat," rather than a term deriving from Vksudh, the root more commonly used for hunger, especially the kind of chronic hunger that could come from poverty.
In order: Stephen Engstrom carefully examines Kant's conception of the will as it relates to reason and the desiderative economy of human life.
This essay argues that subjectivists have erred in accepting a desiderative theory of valuing.
Possible Stocker cases aside, (35) there will generally be some feature of the action-plan that appeals to one's desires; perhaps the content of what is intended can be cleaved at what is intuitively the proper joint by reference to the agent's desiderative profile.
Again, this is borne out by the examples given by Hengeveld, which are concerned with interactions between illocutionary mitigation (Level 4) and commitment to the truth of the proposition (Level 3), desiderative mood (Level 3) and nonactuality of the SoA referred to by the predication (Level 2), and objective epistemic modality (Level 2) and phasal aspect (Level 1).
Thus although Aristotle states that choice is the result of both desire and deliberation, that "The intellect alone moves nothing," that it is ratiocinative desire or desiderative reason, as W.
Rafferty explains that such teachers also must be reflective; flexible; collaborative; desiderative (i.
1997) (describing a consensus over internalism regarding reasons for action and a desiderative account of internalism); see also MICHAEL SMITH, THE MORAL PROBLEM 92-129 (1994); BERNARD WILLIAMS, Internal and External Reasons, in MORAL LUCK: PHILOSOPHICAL PAPERS 1973-1980, at 101, 102-04 (1981); Philip Pettit & Michael Smith, Practical Unreason, 102 MIND 53, 53-77 (1993).