despotic


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des·pot

 (dĕs′pət)
n.
1. A ruler with absolute power.
2. A person who wields power oppressively; a tyrant.
3.
a. A Byzantine emperor or prince.
b. An Eastern Orthodox bishop or patriarch.

[French despote, from Medieval Latin despota, from Greek despotēs, master; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]

des·pot′ic (dĭ-spŏt′ĭk) adj.
des·pot′i·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.despotic - belonging to or having the characteristics of a despot
2.despotic - ruled by or characteristic of a despot; "moved from a feudal to a despotic order"; "his administration was arrogant and despotic"
undemocratic - not in agreement with or according to democratic doctrine or practice or ideals; "the union broke with its past undemocratic procedures"
3.despotic - characteristic of an absolute ruler or absolute ruledespotic - characteristic of an absolute ruler or absolute rule; having absolute sovereignty; "an authoritarian regime"; "autocratic government"; "despotic rulers"; "a dictatorial rule that lasted for the duration of the war"; "a tyrannical government"
undemocratic - not in agreement with or according to democratic doctrine or practice or ideals; "the union broke with its past undemocratic procedures"

despotic

adjective tyrannical, authoritarian, dictatorial, absolute, arrogant, oppressive, autocratic, imperious, domineering, monocratic The country was ruled by a despotic tyrant.

despotic

adjective
2. Characterized by or favoring absolute obedience to authority:
Translations
طُغْياني، اسْتِبْدادي
despotický
despotiskdiktatorisk
despoottinenitsevaltainen
önkényuralmizsarnoki
einræîis-; harîstjórnar-
zorbaca

despotic

[desˈpɒtɪk] ADJdéspota

despotic

[dɪˈspɒtɪk] adj (= tyrannical) [power, regime, government] → despotique

despotic

adj, despotically
adv (lit, fig)despotisch, herrisch

despotic

[dɛsˈpɒtɪk] adjdispotico/a

despot

(ˈdespot) , ((American) -pət) noun
a person (usually the king or ruler of a country) with absolute power, often a tyrant.
deˈspotic adjective
deˈspotically adverb
ˈdespotism (-pə-) noun
absolute power or tyranny.
References in classic literature ?
We rule the hearts of mightiest men - we rule "With a despotic sway all giant minds.
A tyranny then is, as has been said, a monarchy, where one person has an absolute and despotic power over the whole community and every member therein: an oligarchy, where the supreme power of the state is lodged with the rich: a democracy, on the contrary, is where those have it who are worth little or nothing.
I owe to her the awakened love for the sea that, with the quivering of her swift little body and the humming of the wind under the foot of her lateen sails, stole into my heart with a sort of gentle violence, and brought my imagination under its despotic sway.
Convinced as you must be from what I have already told you concerning Augustus and Sophia, that there never were a happier Couple, I need not I imagine, inform you that their union had been contrary to the inclinations of their Cruel and Mercenery Parents; who had vainly endeavoured with obstinate Perseverance to force them into a Marriage with those whom they had ever abhorred; but with a Heroic Fortitude worthy to be related and admired, they had both, constantly refused to submit to such despotic Power.
Tom heard the message with a forewarning heart; for he knew all the plan of the fugitives' escape, and the place of their present concealment;--he knew the deadly character of the man he had to deal with, and his despotic power.
An enlightened zeal for the energy and efficiency of government will be stigmatized as the offspring of a temper fond of despotic power and hostile to the principles of liberty.
The concentrating these in the same hands, is precisely the definition of despotic government.
The British Crown exercises a real and despotic dominion over the larger portion of this vast country, and has a governor-general stationed at Calcutta, governors at Madras, Bombay, and in Bengal, and a lieutenant-governor at Agra.
It was feared by the Puritans that he would assume despotic power.
The wars, the guillotine and exile had reduced it to two, one of which was despotic in her government, so far as theory was concerned at least; possibly, at times, a little so in practice.
The Prince of Saxe Leinitzer kept up still a semblance of royalty in the State which his ancestors had ruled with despotic power.
Old John having long encroached a good standard inch, full measure, on the liberty of Joe, and having snipped off a Flemish ell in the matter of the parole, grew so despotic and so great, that his thirst for conquest knew no bounds.