despotic


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des·pot

 (dĕs′pət)
n.
1. A ruler with absolute power.
2. A person who wields power oppressively; a tyrant.
3.
a. A Byzantine emperor or prince.
b. An Eastern Orthodox bishop or patriarch.

[French despote, from Medieval Latin despota, from Greek despotēs, master; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]

des·pot′ic (dĭ-spŏt′ĭk) adj.
des·pot′i·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.despotic - belonging to or having the characteristics of a despot
2.despotic - ruled by or characteristic of a despot; "moved from a feudal to a despotic order"; "his administration was arrogant and despotic"
undemocratic - not in agreement with or according to democratic doctrine or practice or ideals; "the union broke with its past undemocratic procedures"
3.despotic - characteristic of an absolute ruler or absolute ruledespotic - characteristic of an absolute ruler or absolute rule; having absolute sovereignty; "an authoritarian regime"; "autocratic government"; "despotic rulers"; "a dictatorial rule that lasted for the duration of the war"; "a tyrannical government"
undemocratic - not in agreement with or according to democratic doctrine or practice or ideals; "the union broke with its past undemocratic procedures"

despotic

adjective tyrannical, authoritarian, dictatorial, absolute, arrogant, oppressive, autocratic, imperious, domineering, monocratic The country was ruled by a despotic tyrant.

despotic

adjective
2. Characterized by or favoring absolute obedience to authority:
Translations
طُغْياني، اسْتِبْدادي
despotický
despotiskdiktatorisk
despoottinenitsevaltainen
önkényuralmizsarnoki
einræîis-; harîstjórnar-
zorbaca

despotic

[desˈpɒtɪk] ADJdéspota

despotic

[dɪˈspɒtɪk] adj (= tyrannical) [power, regime, government] → despotique

despotic

adj, despotically
adv (lit, fig)despotisch, herrisch

despotic

[dɛsˈpɒtɪk] adjdispotico/a

despot

(ˈdespot) , ((American) -pət) noun
a person (usually the king or ruler of a country) with absolute power, often a tyrant.
deˈspotic adjective
deˈspotically adverb
ˈdespotism (-pə-) noun
absolute power or tyranny.
References in classic literature ?
He was, in truth, their ruler; and, so long as he could maintain his popularity, no monarch could be more despotic, especially while the tribe continued in a hostile country.
The public is despotic in its temper; it is capable of denying common justice when too strenuously demanded as a right; but quite as frequently it awards more than justice, when the appeal is made, as despots love to have it made, entirely to its generosity.
In his hand he swayed a ferule, that sceptre of despotic power; the birch of justice reposed on three nails behind the throne, a constant terror to evil doers, while on the desk before him might be seen sundry contraband articles and prohibited weapons, detected upon the persons of idle urchins, such as half-munched apples, popguns, whirligigs, fly-cages, and whole legions of rampant little paper game-cocks.
He is despotic, and unmerciful to insubordination; he would shoot a fellow down with as little remorse as he would shoot a buck, if he opposed him.
The well-known face was there: stern, relentless as ever--there was that peculiar eye which nothing could melt, and the somewhat raised, imperious, despotic eyebrow.
When I had groped my way, blindly, through these difficulties, and had mastered the alphabet, which was an Egyptian Temple in itself, there then appeared a procession of new horrors, called arbitrary characters; the most despotic characters I have ever known; who insisted, for instance, that a thing like the beginning of a cobweb, meant expectation, and that a pen-and-ink sky-rocket, stood for disadvantageous.
It was a sort of vault on the ground floor at the back, with a despotic monster of a four-post bedstead in it, straddling over the whole place, putting one of his arbitrary legs into the fire-place and another into the doorway, and squeezing the wretched little washing-stand in quite a Divinely Righteous manner.
Thus trained in the exercise not only of free will, but despotic authority, Rowena was, by her previous education, disposed both to resist and to resent any attempt to control her affections, or dispose of her hand contrary to her inclinations, and to assert her independence in a case in which even those females who have been trained up to obedience and subjection, are not infrequently apt to dispute the authority of guardians and parents.
The grandfathers of 1876 were fond of telling how Webster opposed taking Texas and Oregon into the Union; how George Washington advised against including the Mississippi River; and how Monroe warned Congress that a country that reached from the Atlantic to the Middle West was "too extensive to be governed but by a despotic monarchy.
The grossly immoral and dishonest doctrine of despotic State sovereignty, the exclusive judge of its own obligations, and responsible to no power on earth or in heaven, for the violation of them, is not there.
An enlightened zeal for the energy and efficiency of government will be stigmatized as the offspring of a temper fond of despotic power and hostile to the principles of liberty.
The concentrating these in the same hands, is precisely the definition of despotic government.