destitute


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des·ti·tute

 (dĕs′tĭ-to͞ot′, -tyo͞ot′)
adj.
1. Lacking resources or the means of subsistence; completely impoverished.
2. Utterly lacking; devoid: Young recruits destitute of any experience.

[Middle English, from Latin dēstitūtus, past participle of dēstituere, to abandon : dē-, de- + statuere, to set; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

des′ti·tute′ness n.

destitute

(ˈdɛstɪˌtjuːt)
adj
1. (Social Welfare) lacking the means of subsistence; totally impoverished
2. (foll by: of) completely lacking; deprived or bereft (of): destitute of words.
3. obsolete abandoned or deserted
[C14: from Latin dēstitūtus forsaken, from dēstituere to leave alone, from statuere to place]
ˈdestiˌtuteness n

des•ti•tute

(ˈdɛs tɪˌtut, -ˌtyut)

adj., v. -tut•ed, -tut•ing. adj.
1. without means of subsistence; lacking food, clothing, and shelter.
2. deprived of, devoid of, or lacking (often fol. by of): destitute of feeling.
v.t.
3. to leave destitute.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin dēstitūtus, past participle of dēstituere to abandon, deprive of support =dē- de- + -stituere, comb. form of statuere to cause to stand]
des′ti•tute`ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.destitute - poor enough to need help from others
poor - having little money or few possessions; "deplored the gap between rich and poor countries"; "the proverbial poor artist living in a garret"
2.destitute - completely wanting or lacking; "writing barren of insight"; "young recruits destitute of experience"; "innocent of literary merit"; "the sentence was devoid of meaning"
nonexistent - not having existence or being or actuality; "chimeras are nonexistent"

destitute

adjective penniless, poor, impoverished, distressed, needy, on the rocks, insolvent, poverty-stricken, down and out, indigent, impecunious, dirt-poor (informal), on the breadline (informal), flat broke (informal), short, penurious, on your uppers, necessitous, in queer street (informal), moneyless, without two pennies to rub together (informal) destitute children who live on the streets
destitute of lacking, wanting, without, in need of, deprived of, devoid of, bereft of, empty of, drained of, deficient in, depleted in a country destitute of natural resources

destitute

adjective
1. Not having a desirable element:
Idiom: in want of.
Translations
مُعْوِز، مُعْدِم، خالي الوِفاض
bez prostředkůstrádající
forarmet
blásnauîur
be lėšųskurstantis
nabadzīgstrūcīgs
bez prostriedkov

destitute

[ˈdestɪtjuːt] ADJ
1. (= poverty-stricken) → indigente
to be (utterly) destituteestar en la (más absoluta) miseria
2. (= lacking) destitute ofdesprovisto de

destitute

[ˈdɛstɪtjuːt]
adj
(= poor) [person] → misérable, dans la misère
to be left destitute → être plongé(e) dans la misère
destitute of (= lacking) → dépourvu(e) de, dénué(e) de
npl
the destitute → les indigents mpl

destitute

adj
(= poverty-stricken)mittellos; to be utterly destitutebettelarm sein
(= lacking)bar (→ of +gen)
n the destitute pldie Mittellosen, die, die im Elend leben

destitute

[ˈdɛstɪˌtjuːt] adj (frm) → indigente
utterly destitute → ridotto/a in miseria
destitute of → privo/a di

destitute

(ˈdestitjuːt) adjective
in great need of food, shelter etc. They were left destitute when he died.
References in classic literature ?
Home now looked bare and dismal as she thought of it, work grew harder than ever, and she felt that she was a very destitute and much-injured girl, in spite of the new gloves and silk stockings.
He gave thanks for our food and comfort, and prayed for the poor and destitute in great cities, where the struggle for life was harder than it was here with us.
As he was destitute of any other means of defense, his safety now depended entirely on bodily strength and resolution.
It was my happiness to be destitute of this afflicting passion, with which I had the greatest reason to be affected.
Hepzibah blundered to and fro about her small place of business, committing the most unheard-of errors: now stringing up twelve, and now seven, tallow-candles, instead of ten to the pound; selling ginger for Scotch snuff, pins for needles, and needles for pins; misreckoning her change, sometimes to the public detriment, and much oftener to her own; and thus she went on, doing her utmost to bring chaos back again, until, at the close of the day's labor, to her inexplicable astonishment, she found the money-drawer almost destitute of coin.
And it is much to be deplored that the place to which you devote so considerable a portion of the whole term of your natural life, should be so sadly destitute of anything approaching to a cosy inhabitiveness, or adapted to breed a comfortable localness of feeling, such as pertains to a bed, a hammock, a hearse, a sentry box, a pulpit, a coach, or any other of those small and snug contrivances in which men temporarily isolate themselves.
And whatever they may reveal of the divine love in the Son, the soft, curled, hermaphroditical Italian pictures, in which his idea has been most successfully embodied; these pictures, so destitute as they are of all brawniness, hint nothing of any power, but the mere negative, feminine one of submission and endurance, which on all hands it is conceded, form the peculiar practical virtues of his teachings.
The man who had addressed Haley, and who seemed not destitute of compassion, bought her for a trifle, and the spectators began to disperse.
how destitute of friendly counsel and aid, even in his greatest extremities
I acknowledged no natural claim on Adele's part to be supported by me, nor do I now acknowledge any, for I am not her father; but hearing that she was quite destitute, I e'en took the poor thing out of the slime and mud of Paris, and transplanted it here, to grow up clean in the wholesome soil of an English country garden.
Heathcliff has claimed and kept them in his wife's right and his also: I suppose legally; at any rate, Catherine, destitute of cash and friends, cannot disturb his possession.
Military officers destitute of military knowledge; naval officers with no idea of a ship; civil officers without a notion of affairs; brazen ecclesiastics, of the worst world worldly, with sensual eyes, loose tongues, and looser lives; all totally unfit for their several callings, all lying horribly in pretending to belong to them, but all nearly or remotely of the order of Monseigneur, and therefore foisted on all public employments from which anything was to be got; these were to be told off by the score and the score.