destitution


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des·ti·tu·tion

 (dĕs′tĭ-to͞o′shən, -tyo͞o′-)
n.
1. Extreme want of resources or the means of subsistence; complete poverty.
2. A deprivation or lack; a deficiency.

destitution

(ˌdɛstɪˈtjuːʃən)
n
1. (Social Welfare) the state of being destitute; utter poverty
2. rare lack or deficiency

des•ti•tu•tion

(ˌdɛs tɪˈtu ʃən, -ˈtyu-)

n.
lack of the means of subsistence; utter poverty.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.destitution - a state without friends or money or prospects
impoverishment, poorness, poverty - the state of having little or no money and few or no material possessions

destitution

noun pennilessness, want, distress, dire straits, privation, penury, neediness, beggary, indigence, pauperism, impecuniousness, utter poverty Equality will not relieve destitution but will spread it evenly.
riches, plenty, wealth, luxury, prosperity, good fortune, affluence, life of luxury

destitution

noun
Translations

destitution

[ˌdestɪˈtjuːʃən] Nindigencia f, miseria f

destitution

[ˌdɛstɪˈtjuːʃən] ndénuement m, indigence f

destitution

n(bittere) Not, Elend nt; (esp financial) → Mittellosigkeit f

destitution

[ˌdɛstɪˈtjuːʃn] n (frm) → indigenza
References in classic literature ?
Laurence was continually finding some touching case of destitution, and begging the Bhaers to take pity on the child, and he would gladly pay a trifle for its support.
It was more probable, therefore, that the descendants of a Pyncheon who had emigrated to Virginia, in some past generation, and became a great planter there,--hearing of Hepzibah's destitution, and impelled by the splendid generosity of character with which their Virginian mixture must have enriched the New England blood,--would send her a remittance of a thousand dollars, with a hint of repeating the favor annually.
But it was not likely that he had reference to the kind of anguish that comes with destitution, that is so endlessly bitter and cruel, and yet so sordid and petty, so ugly, so humiliating--unredeemed by the slightest touch of dignity or even of pathos.
I could hardly tell how men and women in extremities of destitution proceeded.
Each, moreover, was in an odd state of destitution.
You see, I, who never did a bad action but that I have told you of -- am in destitution, with my poor wife dying of fever before my very eyes, and I unable to do anything in the world for her; I shall die of hunger, as old Dantes did, while Fernand and Danglars are rolling in wealth.
What stage of human destitution, however, is too destitute for vanity
non--non--I am far from saying as much as THAT"--poor girl, her face declared a hundred times more than her tongue, that she was sincere--"I do not--CANNOT say I have no interest in one, who so generously overlooks my poverty, my utter destitution of all worldly greatness, and offers to share with me his fortune and his honorable position--"
With that in your pocket you will run no risk of finding yourself in a state of absolute destitution, which, I know, you will regard as a degradation--so should I, for that matter.
He dwelt likewise upon the emptiness of his pockets, turned over the papers in his pocket-book, and convinced himself of the state of absolute destitution in which he was about to be plunged.
When Edgar, at the age of two years, was orphaned, the family was in the utmost destitution.
He has no idea, poor wretch, of the spiritual destitution of a coral reef in the Pacific or what it costs to look up the precious souls among the coco-nuts and bread-fruit.