detachment


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Related to detachment: vitreous detachment

de·tach·ment

 (dĭ-tăch′mənt)
n.
1. The act or process of disconnecting or detaching; separation.
2. The state of being separate or detached.
3. Indifference to or remoteness from the concerns of others; aloofness: preserved a chilly detachment in his relations with the family.
4. Absence of prejudice or bias; disinterest: strove to maintain her professional detachment in the case.
5.
a. The dispatch of a military unit, such as troops or ships, from a larger body for a special duty or mission.
b. The unit so dispatched.
c. A permanent unit, usually smaller than a platoon, organized for special duties.

detachment

(dɪˈtætʃmənt)
n
1. indifference to other people or to one's surroundings; aloofness
2. (Psychology) freedom from self-interest or bias; disinterest
3. the act of disengaging or separating something
4. the condition of being disengaged or separated; disconnection
5. (Military) military
a. the separation of a small unit from its main body, esp of ships or troops
b. the unit so detached
6. (Law) Canadian a branch office of a police force
7. (Logic) logic the rule whereby the consequent of a true conditional statement, given the truth of its antecedent, may be asserted on its own. See also modus ponens

de•tach•ment

(dɪˈtætʃ mənt)

n.
1. the act of detaching or the condition of being detached.
2. aloofness; disinterest.
3. freedom from prejudice or partiality.
4. a body of troops or ships detached for a special mission.
5. Canadian. the smallest administrative unit in a police force.
[1660–70; < French détachement. See detach, -ment]

detachment

1. A part of a unit separated from its main organization for duty elsewhere.
2. A temporary military or naval unit formed from other units or parts of units. Also called DET.

Detachment

 a body of troops; part of a fleet. See also detail.
Examples: detachment of actors, 1739; of cavalry, 1781; of ships; of troops, 1678; of witnesses, 1681.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.detachment - avoiding emotional involvement
indifference - unbiased impartial unconcern
2.detachment - the act of releasing from an attachment or connection
separation - the act of dividing or disconnecting
3.detachment - the state of being isolated or detached; "the insulation of England was preserved by the English Channel"
isolation - a state of separation between persons or groups
4.detachment - a small unit of troops of special composition
army unit - a military unit that is part of an army
bodyguard - a group of men who escort and protect some important person
patrol - a detachment used for security or reconnaissance
picket - a detachment of troops guarding an army from surprise attack
press gang - a detachment empowered to force civilians to serve in the army or navy
provost guard - a detachment under the command of a provost marshall
rearguard - a detachment assigned to protect the rear of a (retreating) military body
flanker - a soldier who is a member of a detachment assigned to guard the flanks of a military formation
5.detachment - coming apart
alteration, change, modification - an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to another; "the change was intended to increase sales"; "this storm is certainly a change for the worse"; "the neighborhood had undergone few modifications since his last visit years ago"
falling out, severance, rupture, rift, breach, break - a personal or social separation (as between opposing factions); "they hoped to avoid a break in relations"
break - the occurrence of breaking; "the break in the dam threatened the valley"

detachment

detachment

noun
1. The act or process of detaching:
2. The act or an instance of separating one thing from another:
3. Dissociation from one's surroundings or worldly affairs:
5. A group of people organized for a particular purpose:
6. A unit of troops on special assignment:
Translations
عَدَم تَحَيُّزفَصلمَفْرَزَه من الجُنود
nestrannostnezaujatostodděleníoddílodloučení
afdelingafrivningfrigørelseuengageretheduengagering
függetlenségleválasztás
aîskilnaîur, losunhlutleysi, hleypidómaleysiliîssveit
oddeľovanievyčlenená jednotka
ayırmamüfrezetarafsızlıkyansızlık

detachment

[dɪˈtætʃmənt] N
1. (= separation) → separación f, desprendimiento m
2. (= impartiality) → objetividad f, imparcialidad f; (= indifference) → indiferencia f
an air of detachmentun aire de indiferencia
3. (Mil) → destacamento m

detachment

[dɪˈtætʃmənt] n
[person] → détachement m, indifférence f
(MILITARY) (= group of soldiers) → détachement m

detachment

n
(= act of separating, of part of machine) → Abnehmen nt; (of section of form, document)Abtrennen nt; (of rope, cart)Loslösen nt
(= lack of emotion)Distanz f; (= objectivity)Abstand m
(Mil) → Sonderkommando nt, → Abordnung f

detachment

[dɪˈtætʃmənt] n
a. (aloofness) → distacco
b. (Mil) → distaccamento

detach

(diˈtӕtʃ) verb
to unfasten or remove (from). I detached the bottom part of the form and sent it back.
deˈtachable adjective
able to be detached.
deˈtached adjective
1. standing etc apart or by itself. a detached house.
2. not personally involved or showing no emotion or prejudice. a detached attitude to the problem.
deˈtachment noun
1. the state of not being influenced by emotion or prejudice.
2. the act of detaching.
3. a group (especially of soldiers). A detachment was sent to guard the supplies.

de·tach·ment

n. desprendimiento, separación;
___ of the retina___ de la retina.

detachment

n desprendimiento; (psych) distanciamiento; retinal — desprendimiento de retina
References in classic literature ?
Then Jo and Meg, with a detachment of the bigger boys, set forth the supper on the grass, for an out-of-door tea was always the crowning joy of the day.
They belonged to a small detachment of Confederate forces and were awaiting orders to march.
The rude path, which originally formed their line of communication, had been widened for the passage of wagons; so that the distance which had been traveled by the son of the forest in two hours, might easily be effected by a detachment of troops, with their necessary baggage, between the rising and setting of a summer sun.
She expressed in her little way an extraordinary detachment from disagreeable duties, looking to me, however, with a great childish light that seemed to offer it as a mere result of the affection she had conceived for my person, which had rendered necessary that she should follow me.
In the next hour I got a couple more, and they went the way of the first one, down the throats of the detachment.
A wire rope led from the foretopmast to the file of mules on the tow-path a hundred yards ahead, and by dint of much banging and swearing and urging, the detachment of drivers managed to get a speed of two or three miles an hour out of the mules against the stiff current.
At the last pair of bars the two girls were sometimes met by a detachment of the Simpson children, who lived in a black house with a red door and a red barn behind, on the Blueberry Plains road.
Lorry observed to be all of a red colour, and to have red hair, and to be dressed in some extraordinary tight-fitting fashion, and to have on her head a most wonderful bonnet like a Grenadier wooden measure, and good measure too, or a great Stilton cheese, came running into the room in advance of the inn servants, and soon settled the question of his detachment from the poor young lady, by laying a brawny hand upon his chest, and sending him flying back against the nearest wall.
On my arrival at my father's capital, I was astonished to find a large detachment of guards drawn up before the gate of the palace; they surrounded me directly I entered.
The general with ten more escaped the slaughter, and by means of their horses retreated to a wood, where they were soon discovered by a detachment sent in search of them, and brought to Mahomet, who was overjoyed to see his most formidable enemy in his power, and ordered him to take care of his uncle and nephew, who were wounded, telling him he should answer for their lives; and, upon their death, taxed him with hastening it.
The building itself showed in the distance a blaze of glorious light, and on the instant I determined to lead a detachment of warriors directly within the palace itself, while the balance of the great horde was attacking the barracks of the soldiery.
Should he send another detachment to the rescue of the first?