determinacy


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de·ter·mi·na·cy

 (dĭ-tûr′mə-nə-sē)
n.
1. The quality or condition of being determinate.
2. The condition of being determined or characterized.

determinacy

(dɪˈtɜːmɪnəsɪ)
n
1. the quality of being defined or fixed
2. the condition of being predicted or deduced

de•ter•mi•na•cy

(dɪˈtɜr mə nə si)

n.
1. the quality of being determinate.
2. the condition of being determined.
[1870–75]

determinacy

the state of being determinate; the quality of being certain or precise.
See also: Knowledge
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References in periodicals archive ?
How can the flow of [phrase omitted] be granted and yet a certain moment of determinacy be maintained?
from other sources: ontological determinacy, practical versatility, and
For Hegel the zone of indeterminacy, at its greatest level of abstraction, is a suspension of determinacy that reveals an immanent logic implying further development.
More specifically, if the fraction of non-Ricardian agents passes a certain threshold, equilibrium determinacy requires the interest rate rule's response to inflation to be either sufficiently above or sufficiently below one--that is, sufficiently active or sufficiently passive--under a contemporaneous timing of the Taylor's rule (Gali et al.
The factor determinacy, which is the correlation between the estimated factor and the true factor score, was .
1807), one of four jurists who drafted it, expounded on the importance of clarity and determinacy of rules, an essential motivation for the writing of the code.
Of course, in our modern society obsessed with measurements and determinacy, not only governments but also private merchants constantly try to create the illusion of inherent value.
He neglects, for example, the productive psychological and literary potential inherent in modernist travel writing that found expression in the realization of the palimpsestuality and determinacy of established knowledge dispositifs.
Contending "that the ultimate aim of Coleridgean education is to turn the working of free will into the automatism of habit" (2), Timar scrutinizes Coleridge's idea of the human by focusing on three concepts that seem to reveal the complex entanglements and potential material determinacy of the Coleridgean will.
The locus fin accounts for determinacy in most varieties with determinate growth habit, which originate from the Andean gene pool, whereas the second locus accounts for determinacy in some Michigan navy bean cultivars, which resulted from an artificial mutagenesis program (Kelly, 2001).
Raymond Williams contended that this has been due to the kind of determinacy a simplistic reading of the base/superstructure model suggested.