determinism

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de·ter·min·ism

 (dĭ-tûr′mə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The philosophical doctrine that every state of affairs, including every human event, act, and decision, is the inevitable consequence of antecedent states of affairs.

de·ter′min·ist n.
de·ter′min·is′tic adj.
de·ter′min·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

determinism

(dɪˈtɜːmɪˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) Also called: necessitarianism the philosophical doctrine that all events including human actions and choices are fully determined by preceding events and states of affairs, and so that freedom of choice is illusory. Compare free will1b
2. (Philosophy) the scientific doctrine that all occurrences in nature take place in accordance with natural laws
3. (General Physics) the principle in classical mechanics that the values of dynamic variables of a system, and of the forces acting on the system at a given time, completely determine the values of the variables at any later time
deˈterminist n, adj
deˌterminˈistic adj

de•ter•min•ism

(dɪˈtɜr məˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. a doctrine that all facts and events exemplify natural laws.
2. a doctrine that all events have sufficient causes.
[1840–50]
de•ter′min•ist, n., adj.
de•ter`min•is′tic, adj.
de•ter`min•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

determinism

1. the doctrine that all f acts and events result from the operation of natural laws.
2. the doctrine that all events, including human choices and decisions, are necessarily determined by motives, which are regarded as external forces acting on the will. Also called predeterminism. Cf. fatalism.determinist, n.deterministic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

determinism

The theory that all events are caused, and that there is no free will.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.determinism - (philosophy) a philosophical theory holding that all events are inevitable consequences of antecedent sufficient causes; often understood as denying the possibility of free will
fatalism - a philosophical doctrine holding that all events are predetermined in advance for all time and human beings are powerless to change them
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Translations
determinismus
determinismi
determinizam
determinizm

determinism

[dɪˈtɜːmɪnɪzəm] Ndeterminismo m

determinism

[dɪˈtɜːrmɪnɪzəm] ndéterminisme m

determinism

determinism

[dɪˈtɜːmɪˌnɪzəm] ndeterminismo

de·ter·mi·nism

n. determinismo, teoría que establece que todo fenómeno influido físico o psíquico está predeterminado y no es influido por la voluntad individual.
References in classic literature ?
Good innocent creature, worthy wife, excellent mother (of the strict governess type), she was as guileless of consequences as any determinist philosopher ever was.
Economic determinists would argue you can understand all you need to about the rise of populism from measuring inequality and the disenfranchisement of the communities that lost out under freer trade.
It has further been argued that the biological determinists often ignore the fact that most sex is not in fact reproductive.
This is why scholars like Samuel Huntington, who argued that future conflicts will be caused by a clash of civilizations, are cultural determinists with a strong belief in essentialism.
Barbara Smoker, on the other hand, believes that most humanists are determinists.
His main argument is logical in nature: he claims that determinism is self-undermining, because "when determinists want to include everything in the universe, it must include the doctrine of determinism as well.
It is common for determinists to tout determinism as scientifically proven, or declare that we must accept determinism in order to be scientific, without ever stating precisely what evidence or arguments they believe they have in support of determinism.
ultimate truth and how that connects to the self, free will, and moral responsibility; next, it shows how Repetti's argumentation fails to establish a clear metaphysical distinction between Goodman's view of the conventional self and his own view of the "mind-dependent" self; lastly, the article argues that hard determinists such as Goodman do believe in the causal efficacy of the will, and as a result that Goodman and Repetti's disagreement over the ultimate existence of free will may be inconsequential.
Because what is called "avoidance" is a form of behavior that is determined to occur, just as any other form of behavior is determined to occur by way of the daisy chain of efficient causal links that connect the primordial past with the endless future (as per the picture determinists offer of reality).
As Bonnie Spanier points out: "openly gay or pro-gay scientists have joined traditionally conservative biological determinists and are apparently impelled by reasons ranging from simply feeling they were born gay to recognizing the strength of legal arguments that if gayness is inborn rather than a lifestyle choice, people cannot be blamed for something over which they have no control" (1995: 54).
For biological determinists, the "self" is reduced to a complex array of electro-chemical events; we are neurologically programmed with impulses to do certain things and avoid others.