deterrability

deterrability

(dɪˌtɜːrəˈbɪlɪtɪ)
n
the quality of being deterrable
References in periodicals archive ?
Benthamite model also implied a distinction between the deterrability of
For a definitive theoretical foundation of what shapes opponent leaders' innate deterrability, given their interests and perceptions, see George and Smoke, Deterrence in American Foreign Policy, 503-613.
This in no way detracts from the extreme severity of the threat that would be posed by their acquisition of a nuclear capability--such as the ability to terrorize Israel's population, conduct large-scale terror attacks with relative impunity, or attempt to dictate terms--but their deterrability does place the threat in an appropriate context.
In terms of the model, differences in deterrability could arise from differences across offenders in their marginal costs of punishment, due to, for example, differences in their income or opportunity cost of time.
and offender deterrability are very difficult to make reliably and
1) Hate-motivated violence has a higher threshold of deterrability and thus requires an additional element of deterrence (as compared with parallel conduct not arising from hate), and this because it is more likely to recur or more likely to provoke others to further, retaliatory acts.
Experts discussing deterrability need to carefully review perpetrators' statements and actions.
While those afflicted with black rage may qualify as legally insane in that they act without the deterrability and sense of moral blameworthiness necessary to inflict punishment under the utilitarian and retributivist penal schemes, black rage actors should not be permitted to externalize the entirety of moral and legal responsibility onto society.
For instance, Michael Moore has explained away the problem by taking a staunchly deterministic stance and describing most of the seemingly "free will"-based criminal law as based on practical (utilitarian) considerations about deterrability.