detestation


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Related to detestation: loathing

de·tes·ta·tion

 (dē′tĕ-stā′shən)
n.
1. Strong dislike or hatred; abhorrence.
2. One that is detested.

detestation

(ˌdiːtɛsˈteɪʃən)
n
1. intense hatred; abhorrence
2. a person or thing that is detested

de•tes•ta•tion

(ˌdi tɛˈsteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. abhorrence; hatred.
2. a person or thing detested.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.detestation - hate coupled with disgustdetestation - hate coupled with disgust    
disgust - strong feelings of dislike
hate, hatred - the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action

detestation

noun hatred, disgust, loathing, hostility, dislike, animosity, aversion, revulsion, antipathy, abomination, animus, abhorrence, repugnance, odium, execration They were united in their detestation of the government.

detestation

noun
Translations
iljetysinhokammo

detestation

[ˌdiːtesˈteɪʃən] (frm) Ndetestación f, odio m, aborrecimiento m
to hold in detestationdetestar, odiar, aborrecer

detestation

nAbscheu m (→ of vor +dat)

detestation

[ˌdiːtɛsˈteɪʃn] nodio, avversione f
References in classic literature ?
Marking all this, Stubb argued well for his scheme, and turning to the Guernsey-man had a little chat with him, during which the stranger mate expressed his detestation of his Captain as a conceited ignoramus, who had brought them all into so unsavory and unprofitable a pickle.
Time had not modified his ancient detestation of the humble drudge and protector of his boyhood; it was still bitter and uncompromising.
Here again my feelings rose up in detestation of slavery.
Pain, shame, ire, impatience, disgust, detestation, seemed momentarily to hold a quivering conflict in the large pupil dilating under his ebon eyebrow.
SHE wouldn't have borne your abominable behaviour quietly: her detestation and disgust must have found voice.
So long as Colin shut himself up in his room and thought only of his fears and weakness and his detestation of people who looked at him and reflected hourly on humps and early death, he was a hysterical half-crazy little hypochondriac who knew nothing of the sunshine and the spring and also did not know that he could get well and could stand upon his feet if he tried to do it.
As they sat grouped about their spoil, in the scanty light afforded by the old man's lamp, he viewed them with a detestation and disgust, which could hardly have been greater, though they demons, marketing the corpse itself.
As she now stood panting, looking at her with the utmost detestation that she was capable of expressing, and trembling from head to foot with rage and scorn, I thought I had never seen such a sight, and never could see such another.
But as he sat gloating over me, I was supported by a scornful detestation of him that sealed my lips.
Upon the slightest and most unreasonable pretences, as well as upon accusations the most absurd and groundless, their persons and property were exposed to every turn of popular fury; for Norman, Saxon, Dane, and Briton, however adverse these races were to each other, contended which should look with greatest detestation upon a people, whom it was accounted a point of religion to hate, to revile, to despise, to plunder, and to persecute.
This discourse gave us double pleasure, both as it proved that God had confuted the accusations of our enemies, and defended us against their malice without any efforts of our own, and that the people who had shunned us with the strongest detestation were yet lovers of truth, and came to us on their own accord.
At last Don Quixote's end came, after he had received all the sacraments, and had in full and forcible terms expressed his detestation of books of chivalry.