detriment


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det·ri·ment

 (dĕt′rə-mənt)
n.
1. Damage, harm, or loss: took a long leave of absence without detriment to her career.
2. Something that causes damage, harm, or loss: Smoking is a detriment to good health. See Synonyms at disadvantage.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dētrīmentum, from dētrītus, past participle of dēterere, to lessen, wear down : dē-, de- + terere, to rub; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

detriment

(ˈdɛtrɪmənt)
n
1. disadvantage or damage; harm; loss
2. a cause of disadvantage or damage
[C15: from Latin dētrīmentum, a rubbing off, hence damage, from dēterere to rub away, from de- + terere to rub]

det•ri•ment

(ˈdɛ trə mənt)

n.
1. loss, damage, disadvantage, or injury.
2. a cause of loss or damage.
[1400–50; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin dētrīmentum loss, damage =dētrī- (see detritus) + -mentum -ment]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.detriment - a damage or loss
expense - a detriment or sacrifice; "at the expense of"
damage, impairment, harm - the occurrence of a change for the worse

detriment

noun damage, loss, harm, injury, hurt, prejudice, disadvantage, impairment, disservice She supported her husband's career to the detriment of her own.

detriment

noun
1. The action or result of inflicting loss or pain:
2. An unfavorable condition, circumstance, or characteristic:
Translations
ضَرَر، أذى، إساءَه
neprospěchškodaúkor
skade
skaîi
žalingas
kaitējums

detriment

[ˈdetrɪmənt] Ndetrimento m, perjuicio m
to the detriment ofen detrimento or perjuicio de
without detriment tosin (causar) detrimento or perjuicio a

detriment

[ˈdɛtrɪmənt] n
to the detriment of → au détriment de, au préjudice de
without detriment to → sans porter atteinte à, sans porter préjudice à, sans conséquences fâcheuses pour

detriment

nSchaden m, → Nachteil m; to the detriment of somethingzum Schaden einer Sache (gen), → zum Schaden von etw; to somebody’s detrimentzu jds Nachteil; I don’t know anything to his detrimentich weiß nichts Nachteiliges über ihn; without detriment toohne Schaden für

detriment

[ˈdɛtrɪmənt] ndetrimento, danno
to the detriment of → a or con detrimento di, a danno di
without detriment to → senza danno a

detriment

(ˈdetrimənt) noun
harm, damage or disadvantage. to the detriment of his health.
ˌdetriˈmental (-ˈmen-) adjective
causing harm or damage.
References in classic literature ?
And John kissed the smiling face, to the great detriment of the rosebud under the chin.
Hepzibah blundered to and fro about her small place of business, committing the most unheard-of errors: now stringing up twelve, and now seven, tallow-candles, instead of ten to the pound; selling ginger for Scotch snuff, pins for needles, and needles for pins; misreckoning her change, sometimes to the public detriment, and much oftener to her own; and thus she went on, doing her utmost to bring chaos back again, until, at the close of the day's labor, to her inexplicable astonishment, she found the money-drawer almost destitute of coin.
Much and deservedly to my own discredit, therefore, and considerably to the detriment of my official conscience, they continued, during my incumbency, to creep about the wharves, and loiter up and down the Custom-House steps.
So very great is the improvement Time has brought about in such habits, that a moderate statement of the quantity of wine and punch which one man would swallow in the course of a night, without any detriment to his reputation as a perfect gentleman, would seem, in these days, a ridiculous exaggeration.
I felt the greatest admiration for the virtues of this young lady; and, honestly with the view of doing my best to prevent the good-nature of Traddles from being imposed upon, to the detriment of their joint prospects in life, inquired how Mr.
Society--civilized society, at least-- is never very ready to believe anything to the detriment of those who are both rich and fascinating.
In tiny Switzerland there has been government ownership from the first, but with less detriment to the business than elsewhere.
I grant and accord it," said Don Quixote, "provided without detriment or prejudice to my king, my country, or her who holds the key of my heart and freedom, it may be complied with.
The second will be espoused with caution by those who will seriously consider the difficulty of collecting men dispersed over the whole Union; the injury to the innocent, from the procrastinated determination of the charges which might be brought against them; the advantage to the guilty, from the opportunities which delay would afford to intrigue and corruption; and in some cases the detriment to the State, from the prolonged inaction of men whose firm and faithful execution of their duty might have exposed them to the persecution of an intemperate or designing majority in the House of Representatives.
They will see, therefore, that in all cases where power is to be conferred, the point first to be decided is, whether such a power be necessary to the public good; as the next will be, in case of an affirmative decision, to guard as effectually as possible against a perversion of the power to the public detriment.
Volcanoes, so plentiful in the first days of the world, are being extinguished by degrees; the internal heat is weakened, the temperature of the lower strata of the globe is lowered by a perceptible quantity every century to the detriment of our globe, for its heat is its life.
Noirtier has received, without any detriment to his mental faculties?