detrimental


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Related to detrimental: Detrimental reliance

det·ri·men·tal

 (dĕt′rə-mĕn′tl)
adj.
Causing damage or harm; injurious.

det′ri·men′tal·ly adv.

detrimental

(ˌdɛtrɪˈmɛntəl)
adj
(when: postpositive, foll by to) harmful; injurious; prejudicial: smoking can be detrimental to health.
ˌdetriˈmentally adv

det•ri•men•tal

(ˌdɛ trəˈmɛn tl)

adj.
1. damaging; harmful.
n.
2. a detrimental person or thing.
[1650–60]
det`ri•men′tal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.detrimental - (sometimes followed by `to') causing harm or injury; "damaging to career and reputation"; "the reporter's coverage resulted in prejudicial publicity for the defendant"
harmful - causing or capable of causing harm; "too much sun is harmful to the skin"; "harmful effects of smoking"

detrimental

detrimental

adjective
Causing harm or injury:
Translations
مُضِرٌّ، مُسيءٌ
škodlivýv neprospěch
skadelig
détrimentairenuisible
skaîlegur

detrimental

[ˌdetrɪˈmentl] ADJperjudicial (to para)

detrimental

[ˌdɛtrɪˈmɛntəl] adj [effect] → préjudiciable
to have a detrimental effect on sb/sth → avoir un effet préjudiciable sur qn/qch
detrimental to → préjudiciable à, nuisible à

detrimental

adj (to health, reputation) → schädlich (→ to dat); effectnachteilig, schädlich (to für); influenceschädlich; (to case, cause, one’s interest) → abträglich (→ to dat); to be detrimental to somebody/somethingjdm/einer Sache (dat)schaden; this could have a detrimental effectdas könnte sich nachteilig auswirken

detrimental

[ˌdɛtrɪˈmɛntl] adj detrimental (to)dannoso/a (a), nocivo/a (a)
to be detrimental to sth → pregiudicare qc

detriment

(ˈdetrimənt) noun
harm, damage or disadvantage. to the detriment of his health.
ˌdetriˈmental (-ˈmen-) adjective
causing harm or damage.

detrimental

a. perjudicial, nocivo-a.
References in classic literature ?
But should they have such children as some persons usually have, it will be very detrimental.
The countess was accustomed to this tone as a precursor of news of something detrimental to the children's interests, such as the building of a new gallery or conservatory, the inauguration of a private theater or an orchestra.
Without supposing the personal essentiality of the man, it is evident that a change of the chief magistrate, at the breaking out of a war, or at any similar crisis, for another, even of equal merit, would at all times be detrimental to the community, inasmuch as it would substitute inexperience to experience, and would tend to unhinge and set afloat the already settled train of the administration.
Indeed, this may be thought too detrimental a scheme to the French interest, since they would thus lose the advantage they have over other nations in the superiority of their engineers; but when I consider the gallantry and generosity of that people, I am persuaded they would never decline putting themselves upon a par with their adversary; or, as the phrase is, making themselves his match.
I shall excuse you nothing on the plea of being my brother; if I find you stupid, negligent, dissipated, idle, or possessed of any faults detrimental to the interests of the house, I shall dismiss you as I would any other clerk.
This passion is detrimental to me, for you do not reflect that YOU are the cause of its excess.
I believe you will accept the post I offer you," said he, "and hold it for a while: not permanently, though: any more than I could permanently keep the narrow and narrowing--the tranquil, hidden office of English country incumbent; for in your nature is an alloy as detrimental to repose as that in mine, though of a different kind.
I wondered how many other clerks there were up-stairs, and whether they all claimed to have the same detrimental mastery of their fellow-creatures.
In short, to any one in her position, a scandal would be most detrimental.
Still, the competition of two rival companies west of the Rocky Mountains could not but prove detrimental to both, and fraught with those evils, both to the trade and to the Indians, that had attended similar rivalries in the Canadas.
Its waxen drippings (which, in weather so warm, it was quite impossible to prevent) would have been seriously detrimental to the rich dresses of the guests, who, on account of the crowded state of the saloon, could not all be expected to keep from out its centre; that is to say, from under the chandelier.
In reference to this latter point, old John was far from agreeing with his friend; for besides that he by no means approved of an adventurous spirit in the abstract, it occurred to him that if his son and heir had been seriously damaged in a scuffle, the consequences would assuredly have been expensive and inconvenient, and might perhaps have proved detrimental to the Maypole business.