detritus


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de·tri·tus

 (dĭ-trī′təs)
n. pl. detritus
1. Loose fragments or grains that have been worn away from rock.
2. Disintegrated or eroded matter; debris: the detritus of past civilizations.

[French détritus, from Latin dētrītus, from past participle of dēterere, to lessen, wear away; see detriment.]

de·tri′tal (-trīt′l) adj.

detritus

(dɪˈtraɪtəs)
n
1. (Geological Science) a loose mass of stones, silt, etc, worn away from rocks
2. an accumulation of disintegrated material or debris
3. (Biology) the organic debris formed from the decay of organisms
[C18: from French détritus, from Latin dētrītus a rubbing away; see detriment]
deˈtrital adj

de•tri•tus

(dɪˈtraɪ təs)

n.
1. rock in small particles or other material worn or broken away from a mass, as by the action of water or glacial ice.
2. any disintegrated material; debris.
[1785–95; < French détritus < Latin: a rubbing away]
de•tri′tal, adj.

de·tri·tus

(dĭ-trī′təs)
Loose fragments, such as sand or gravel, that have been worn away from rock.

Detritus

 an accumulation of debris; any waste or disintegrated material. See also debris.
Examples: detritus of languages, 1851; of ruins, 1866; of loose stones, 1851; loose detritus of thought, 1849.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.detritus - the remains of something that has been destroyed or broken updetritus - the remains of something that has been destroyed or broken up
rubbish, trash, scrap - worthless material that is to be disposed of
slack - dust consisting of a mixture of small coal fragments and coal dust and dirt that sifts out when coal is passed over a sieve
2.detritus - loose material (stone fragments and silt etc) that is worn away from rocks
material, stuff - the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; "coal is a hard black material"; "wheat is the stuff they use to make bread"

detritus

noun debris, remains, waste, rubbish, fragments, litter burnt-out buildings, littered with the detritus of war
Translations

detritus

[dɪˈtraɪtəs] N (frm) → detrito(s) m(pl), detritus m

detritus

[dɪˈtraɪtəs] n (= rubbish) → détritus m

detritus

n (Geol) → Geröll nt; (fig)Müll m

detritus

[dɪˈtraɪtəs] n
a. (rubbish) → rifiuti mpl (fig) the detritus of societyi rifiuti della società
b. (Geol) → rocce fpl detritiche

de·tri·tus

n., pl. desechos.
References in classic literature ?
The foundation of their airy castles lay already before them in the strip of rich alluvium on the river bank, where the North Fork, sharply curving round the base of Devil's Spur, had for centuries swept the detritus of gulch and canyon.
These plains are often of a desolate sterility; mere sandy wastes, formed of the detritus of the granite heights, destitute of trees and herbage, scorched by the ardent and reflected rays of the summer's sun, and in winter swept by chilling blasts from the snow-clad mountains.
In central Chile I was astonished at the structure of a vast mound of detritus, about 800 feet in height, crossing a valley of the Andes; and this I now feel convinced was a gigantic moraine, left far below any existing glacier.
At last we discovered some by looking close to the mountain, for at the distance even of a few hundred yards the streamlets were buried and entirely lost in the friable calcareous stone and loose detritus.
Les benevoles se sont fixes comme objectif de la debarrasser des detritus jetes par les visiteurs et qui s'y sont accumules depuis des mois.
com)-- Artist Luz Maria Sanchez opens her latest show: detritus today, September 19, 2015 from 7- 9 pm at She Works Flexible gallery in Houston, Texas.
It looks as if a lorry load of paper and other detritus has been strewn along the verges, into hedges, etc.
Re:Purposed will explore several of the more recognizable trends among artists who consistently "repurpose" garbage or detritus in their practice.
The detritus that was mentioned (hard muck) is a sight that features right across the town.
Amorphous detritus represents organic precipitates in food webs of streams (Bowen, 1984).
Matching up pieces of plastic, a brainnumbingly difficult process which is akin to some particularly grisly round on The Krypton Factor as you set aside the doll detritus with forensic precision in the hope of returning a toy back to its former glory ?
A Derb Omar, autre quartier commercant repute a l'echelon national, regional et international, les detritus s'accumulent aussi bien au bas des immeubles, des rues qu'en face des commerces.