devalorization

devalorization

(diːˌvæləraɪˈzeɪʃən)
n
1. (Economics) another name for devaluation
2. another name for devaluation
References in periodicals archive ?
Georges Canguilhem has noted that Comte's rehabilitation of fetishism marked a break with the traditional Enlightenment idea of progress as the gradual attainment of perfection, which implied an intrinsic transformation of human nature, and the devalorization of the past.
In this way, the devalorization of the maternity of women who find themselves in prison, sustains, at the same time, the delegitimation of their reproductive rights and an authoritarian penitentiary practice where there is no space for the voice of women, nor an effort that favors the self-care and reflection regarding reproduction in the personal, social, and affective-sexual life project of these women, as defended by Diniz (10).
For example, Ruane (10) focuses on collectivism of funding and the production of healthcare, accompanied by planning and based on the devalorization of labour, as the central features of the NHS in 1948 rather than focusing on principles such as comprehensiveness and universality.
Of course, apparently, it seems like that in the Court's opinion, only if excessive, leading to the devalorization of parties.
Additionally, Alicia Schmidt Camacho has explained how "voicing the unspeakable in public has been a vital means to interrupt the devalorization of the dead as disposable bodies" (273).
According to Wynter, "one cannot revalorize oneself in the terms of one's racial blackness and therefore of one's biological characteristics, however inversely so, given that it is precisely the biocentric nature of the sociogenic code our present genre of being human, which imperatively calls for the devalorization of the characteristics of blackness.
While this challenge is raised by Cherki: who notes that Fanon describes the loss of language, of the violence of history and its renewals from generation to generation, of rejections, of the devalorization and of the exclusions of references and genealogies, of arrested traumas, all frozen in an impossible elaboration caused by denial and silencing (p 135), scholars like Skyi-Out fail to note how assumptions, lacking African ethnographic grounding, by scholars have the tendency to silence and hence to perpetuate colonialism of the dominated by silencing them and denying them voice on issues of justice.
Sze has reflected on all of these precursors, yet their modernist purity and progressivity is relativized in each of her citational instantiations by the incessant process of devalorization and exchangeability under the universal rule of spectacle.
a massive disproportion between the valorization of knowledge and the devalorization of the workforce, as well as between the old Fordist investment policies in welfare institutions and the new market demands;
34) This emphasis differs from that of Evans, who does not address subjective equivocation as such and assumes that suicide necessarily implies a devalorization of the suicide's own life.
Cities in this century have "new dynamics of inequality," (22) a "valorization of certain spaces and people, and the simultaneous but interlocking devalorization of those deemed marginal, such as immigrants and the urban poor.
These four, privatization, proliferation, segmentation of labor contracts, and devalorization of lower-segment work, are widely understood to be aspects of neoliberalization but are less widely studied up close.