toxicity

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Related to developmental toxicity: reproductive toxicity

tox·ic·i·ty

 (tŏk-sĭs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. tox·ic·i·ties
1. The quality or condition of being toxic.
2. The degree to which a substance is toxic.

toxicity

(tɒkˈsɪsɪtɪ)
n
1. the degree of strength of a poison
2. the state or quality of being poisonous

tox•ic•i•ty

(tɒkˈsɪs ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
the quality, relative degree, or specific degree of being toxic or poisonous.
[1880–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.toxicity - the degree to which something is poisonoustoxicity - the degree to which something is poisonous
definite quantity - a specific measure of amount
cytotoxicity - the degree to which something is toxic to living cells
2.toxicity - grave harmfulness or deadlinesstoxicity - grave harmfulness or deadliness  
unwholesomeness, morbidness, morbidity - the quality of being unhealthful and generally bad for you
Translations
myrkyllisyys

toxicity

[ˌtɒkˈsɪsɪtɪ] Ntoxicidad f

toxicity

[tɒkˈsɪsəti] ntoxicité f

toxicity

nGiftigkeit f, → Giftgehalt m

tox·ic·i·ty

n. toxicidad,
cualidad de ser venenoso;
reacción adversa a una medicina.

toxicity

n toxicidad f
References in periodicals archive ?
Of these 800 or so chemicals, lead-containing consumer products have been consistently targeted since its listing as a chemical that is known to cause developmental toxicity in males and females in February 1987.
Associated hazards include: acute toxicity (acute lethality at high concentrations only), blood toxicity, immunotoxicity, cardiovascular toxicity, liver toxicity, kidney toxicity, reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity, and neurotoxicity.
An example of the concept is ES1: Here the main question is whether a new AOP for developmental toxicity can be defined on the basis of gap junction changes induced by toxicants, and whether such a key event (KE) would be beneficial for a KE-based test battery.
Heavy metals including Cr are being involved in developmental toxicity besides general toxicity (Domingo, 1994).
Consistent with these considerations, both OECD and NTP have introduced new guidelines for reproductive and developmental toxicity with more functional end points to assess how agents affect the reproductive and endocrine status of animals (NTP 2011a; OECD 2011).
Included are embryogenesis, developmental genetics, mechanisms of teratogenicity, and testing for reproductive and developmental toxicity.
There are no human pregnancy data for these two combination products but, based on animal data, they can be classified as low risk (no developmental toxicity in two or more animal species).
Studies done with zebrafish--an animal model that closely resembles human reaction to toxic chemicals--showed developmental toxicity to embryos.
They discuss such topics as registering, evaluating, authorizing, and restricting (REACH) environmental chemicals, early embryo development and bipotential gonad formation, assessing the reproductive health of men with occupational exposures, molecular structural characteristics that influence partitioning of xenobiotics into human breast milk, and adverse outcome pathways for developmental toxicity.
The researchers chose drug cardiac developmental toxicity screening to demonstrate a clinically relevant application of the cardiac microchambers.
Doctoral level subject matter experts (SMEs) in endocrine disruption, ecotoxicity, developmental toxicity, genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and quantitative structure activity relationships make up the 2 branches of the Portfolio (Toxicity Evaluation Program; Health Effects Research Program).

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