deviance


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Related to deviance: Social deviance

de·vi·ant

 (dē′vē-ənt)
adj.
Differing from a norm or from the accepted standards of a society.
n.
One that differs from a norm, especially a person whose behavior and attitudes differ from accepted social standards.

[Middle English deviaunt, from Late Latin dēviāns, dēviant-, present participle of dēviāre, to deviate; see deviate.]

de′vi·ance, de′vi·an·cy n.

deviance

(ˈdiːvɪəns)
n
1. Also called: deviancy the act or state of being deviant
2. (Statistics) statistics a measure of the degree of fit of a statistical model compared to that of a more complete model

de•vi•ance

(ˈdi vi əns)

also de′vi•an•cy,



n.
1. deviant quality or state.
2. deviant behavior.
[1940–45]

deviance

Divergence from the accepted social norms of behavior. Deviance can be beneficial to society if unorthodox behavior leads to creativity or innovation. Alternatively deviance may be harmful as in the case of crime.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deviance - a state or condition markedly different from the normdeviance - a state or condition markedly different from the norm
abnormalcy, abnormality - an abnormal physical condition resulting from defective genes or developmental deficiencies
chromosomal aberration, chromosomal anomaly, chromosonal disorder, chrosomal abnormality - any change in the normal structure or number of chromosomes; often results in physical or mental abnormalities
deflection, warp - a twist or aberration; especially a perverse or abnormal way of judging or acting
2.deviance - deviate behavior
irregularity, abnormality - behavior that breaches the rule or etiquette or custom or morality

deviance

noun
Translations
deviace
poikkeavuus

deviance

[ˈdiːvɪəns] deviancy [ˈdiːvɪənsɪ] N (gen) (also Psych) → desviación f

deviance

[ˈdiːviəns] ndéviance f

deviance

[ˈdiːvɪəns] ndevianza
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing on a database of 748 US and global cases, the authors investigate fraud and misconduct in research from the perspective of deviance and organizational theory, viewing fraud in research as a specific instance of deviance within organizations.
Slicker, 1998; Adalbjarnardottir & Hafsteinsson, 2001) has shown that authoritative parenting is associated with lower levels of general deviance in children (i.
We suggest that psychological ownership (Pierce, Kostova, & Dirks, 2001) may moderate the relationship between customer aggression and workplace deviance by functioning as an important form of psychological capital that employees can utilize when faced with customer aggression.
Unless we do something to prevent the occurrence of deviance in children, our future, our citizens will all be questioned.
There is a possibility that there might be a close link between workplace hours and deviance observed.
Negative workplace deviance has become increasingly commonplace among organizations.
Social retaliation victimization may happen when supervisors or peers who are satisfied with their performance appraisal blame or threaten other members who are not performing very well, which results in interpersonal deviance.
Samuels received a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology of Law, Deviance and Criminology from the University of Michigan and a Juris Doctorate with a Certificate of Real Estate Law from Brooklyn Law School.
Cusack (who is also the editor of Journal of Law and Social Deviance) discusses criminal acts, deviance, rebellion, and power in contexts demonstrating that hair is an intricate and important issue and piece of evidence in criminal justice, constitutional law, and public policy.
Deviance is approached from the outset as meaning differences: differences in attitudes, behaviors, lifestyles, and values of people.
She committed these atrocious acts on the very people she had been trusted to care for and targeted their vulnerabilities in order to satisfy her own sexual deviance.
Straight to Hell: True Tales of Deviance, Debauchery, and Billion-Dollar Deals