deviate


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de·vi·ate

 (dē′vē-āt′)
v. de·vi·at·ed, de·vi·at·ing, de·vi·ates
v.intr.
1. To turn aside from a course or way: hikers who deviated from the main path.
2. To depart, as from a norm, purpose, or subject; differ or stray. See Synonyms at swerve.
v.tr.
To cause to turn aside or differ.
n. (-ĭt)
A deviant.

[Late Latin dēviāre, dēviāt- : Latin dē-, de- + Latin via, road; see wegh- in Indo-European roots.]

de′vi·a′tor n.
de′vi·a·to′ry (-ə-tôr′ē) adj.

deviate

vb
1. (usually intr) to differ or diverge or cause to differ or diverge, as in belief or thought
2. (usually intr) to turn aside or cause to turn aside; diverge or cause to diverge
3. (Psychology) (intr) psychol to depart from an accepted standard or convention
n, adj
(Sociology) another word for deviant
[C17: from Late Latin dēviāre to turn aside from the direct road, from de- + via road]
ˈdeviˌator n
ˈdeviatory adj

de•vi•ate

(v. ˈdi viˌeɪt; adj., n. -ɪt)

v. -at•ed, -at•ing,
adj., n. v.i.
1. to turn aside, as from a route or course.
2. to depart, as from an accepted procedure, standard, or course of action.
3. to digress, as from a line of thought.
v.t.
4. to cause to swerve; turn aside.
adj.
5. characterized by deviation or departure from an accepted norm or standard, as of behavior.
n.
6. a person or thing that departs from the accepted norm or standard.
7. a person whose sexual behavior departs from the norm in a socially or morally unacceptable way.
[1625–35; < Late Latin dēviātus, past participle of dēviāre to turn into another road = Latin - de- + -viāre, derivative of via road, way]
de′vi•a`tor, n.
de′vi•a•to`ry (-əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) de′vi•a`tive, adj.
syn: deviate, digress, diverge imply turning or going aside from a path. To deviate is to stray from a usual or established standard, course of action, or route: Fear made him deviate from the truth. To digress is to wander from the main theme in speaking or writing: The speaker digressed to relate an amusing anecdote. To diverge is to differ or to move in different directions from a common point or course: Their interests gradually diverged.

deviate


Past participle: deviated
Gerund: deviating

Imperative
deviate
deviate
Present
I deviate
you deviate
he/she/it deviates
we deviate
you deviate
they deviate
Preterite
I deviated
you deviated
he/she/it deviated
we deviated
you deviated
they deviated
Present Continuous
I am deviating
you are deviating
he/she/it is deviating
we are deviating
you are deviating
they are deviating
Present Perfect
I have deviated
you have deviated
he/she/it has deviated
we have deviated
you have deviated
they have deviated
Past Continuous
I was deviating
you were deviating
he/she/it was deviating
we were deviating
you were deviating
they were deviating
Past Perfect
I had deviated
you had deviated
he/she/it had deviated
we had deviated
you had deviated
they had deviated
Future
I will deviate
you will deviate
he/she/it will deviate
we will deviate
you will deviate
they will deviate
Future Perfect
I will have deviated
you will have deviated
he/she/it will have deviated
we will have deviated
you will have deviated
they will have deviated
Future Continuous
I will be deviating
you will be deviating
he/she/it will be deviating
we will be deviating
you will be deviating
they will be deviating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been deviating
you have been deviating
he/she/it has been deviating
we have been deviating
you have been deviating
they have been deviating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been deviating
you will have been deviating
he/she/it will have been deviating
we will have been deviating
you will have been deviating
they will have been deviating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been deviating
you had been deviating
he/she/it had been deviating
we had been deviating
you had been deviating
they had been deviating
Conditional
I would deviate
you would deviate
he/she/it would deviate
we would deviate
you would deviate
they would deviate
Past Conditional
I would have deviated
you would have deviated
he/she/it would have deviated
we would have deviated
you would have deviated
they would have deviated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deviate - a person whose behavior deviates from what is acceptable especially in sexual behaviordeviate - a person whose behavior deviates from what is acceptable especially in sexual behavior
fetishist - one who engages in fetishism (especially of a sexual nature)
masochist - someone who obtains pleasure from receiving punishment
nympho, nymphomaniac - a woman with abnormal sexual desires
child molester, paederast, pederast - a man who has sex (usually sodomy) with a boy as the passive partner
paedophile, pedophile - an adult who is sexually attracted to children
miscreant, reprobate - a person without moral scruples
sadist - someone who obtains pleasure from inflicting pain or others
sadomasochist - someone who enjoys both sadism and masochism
lech, lecher, letch, satyr - man with strong sexual desires
bugger, sodomist, sodomite, sod - someone who engages in anal copulation (especially a male who engages in anal copulation with another male)
Verb1.deviate - turn aside; turn away from
turn - change orientation or direction, also in the abstract sense; "Turn towards me"; "The mugger turned and fled before I could see his face"; "She turned from herself and learned to listen to others' needs"
yaw - deviate erratically from a set course; "the yawing motion of the ship"
detour - travel via a detour
sidetrack, straggle, digress, depart - wander from a direct or straight course
2.deviate - be at variance withdeviate - be at variance with; be out of line with
aberrate - diverge or deviate from the straight path; produce aberration; "The surfaces of the concave lens may be proportioned so as to aberrate exactly equal to the convex lens"
aberrate - diverge from the expected; "The President aberrated from being a perfect gentleman"
belie, contradict, negate - be in contradiction with
differ - be different; "These two tests differ in only one respect"
conform - be similar, be in line with
3.deviate - cause to turn away from a previous or expected course; "The river was deviated to prevent flooding"
divert - send on a course or in a direction different from the planned or intended one
perturb - cause a celestial body to deviate from a theoretically regular orbital motion, especially as a result of interposed or extraordinary gravitational pull; "The orbits of these stars were perturbed by the passings of a comet"
perturb - disturb or interfere with the usual path of an electron or atom; "The electrons were perturbed by the passing ion"
shunt - provide with or divert by means of an electrical shunt
Adj.1.deviate - markedly different from an accepted norm; "aberrant behavior"; "deviant ideas"
abnormal, unnatural - not normal; not typical or usual or regular or conforming to a norm; "abnormal powers of concentration"; "abnormal amounts of rain"; "abnormal circumstances"; "an abnormal interest in food"

deviate

verb differ, vary, depart, part, turn, bend, drift, wander, stray, veer, swerve, meander, diverge, digress, turn aside He didn't deviate from his schedule.

deviate

verb
1. To turn away from a prescribed course of action or conduct:
Archaic: err.
2. To turn aside, especially from the main subject in writing or speaking:
Idiom: go off at a tangent.
3. To change the direction or course of:
noun
One whose sexual behavior differs from the accepted norm:
Translations
يَنْحَرِف
odchýlit se
afvige
víkja frá, bregîa út af
nukrypimas
novirzīties
sapmak

deviate

[ˈdiːvɪeɪt] VIdesviarse (from de)

deviate

[ˈdiːvieɪt] vi
to deviate from [+ path, task, standard] → dévier de

deviate

vi
(person: from truth, former statement, routine) → abweichen (from von)
(ship, plane, projectile)vom Kurs abweichen or abkommen; (deliberately) → vom Kurs abgehen

deviate

[ˈdiːvɪˌeɪt] vi to deviate (from)deviare (da)

deviate

(ˈdiːvieit) verb
to turn aside, especially from a right, normal or standard course. She will not deviate from her routine.
ˌdeviˈation noun
References in classic literature ?
I had not, it seems, the originality to chalk out a new road to shame and destruction, but trode the old track with stupid exactness not to deviate an inch from the beaten centre.
I communicated to Magwitch - in New South Wales - when he first wrote to me - from New South Wales - the caution that he must not expect me ever to deviate from the strict line of fact.
It will be a pleasure if we can so far deviate from our rules as to give the required information to his lordship.
Fogg, in order not to deviate from his course, furled his sails and increased the force of the steam; but the vessel's speed slackened, owing to the state of the sea, the long waves of which broke against the stern.
But a man is not often found sufficiently circumspect to know how to accommodate himself to the change, both because he cannot deviate from what nature inclines him to do, and also because, having always prospered by acting in one way, he cannot be persuaded that it is well to leave it; and, therefore, the cautious man, when it is time to turn adventurous, does not know how to do it, hence he is ruined; but had he changed his conduct with the times fortune would not have changed.
No; at least, ere I deviate, I will advance far enough to see whither my career tends.
And forthwith he employed himself on the stolid countenance of one of his wooden progeny, and completed it in his own mechanical style, from which he was never known afterwards to deviate.
As to Athos, he was too well acquainted with that tender, but inflexible soul; he could not hope to make it deviate from the fatal road it had just chosen.
I did not invariably confine myself to these rules: it was against my conscience to do so; but I seldom could venture to deviate from them in the slightest degree, without incurring the wrath of my little pupil, and subsequently of his mamma; to whom he would relate my transgressions maliciously exaggerated, or adorned with embellishments of his own; and often, in consequence, was I on the point of losing or resigning my situation.
When a race of plants is once pretty well established, the seed-raisers do not pick out the best plants, but merely go over their seed-beds, and pull up the 'rogues,' as they call the plants that deviate from the proper standard.
It is lucky for the women that the seat of fistycuff war is not the same with them as among men; but though they may seem a little to deviate from their sex, when they go forth to battle, yet I have observed, they never so far forget, as to assail the bosoms of each other; where a few blows would be fatal to most of them.
Not that I should be disposed to recommend (at present) the extreme measures adopted by some States, where an infant whose angle deviates by half a degree from the correct angularity is summarily destroyed at birth.