devoicing


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de·voice

 (dē-vois′)
tr.v. de·voiced, de·voic·ing, de·voic·es
To pronounce (a normally voiced sound) without vibration of the vocal cords so as to make it wholly or partly voiceless.

devoicing

(diːˈvɔɪsɪŋ)
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics the process by which a consonant that is usually voiced becomes devoiced
References in periodicals archive ?
The voiceless variant purte may have been the result of devoicing occurring in the word stem (purtke-n: Genitive Singular) due to the typical vowel dropping in the second syllable.
Syllable final devoicing is not considered a problem for intelligibility, as /v/ is also partially devoiced in NSE.
Unlike the terms unvoiced and voiceless, which are synonymous with one another, devoicing usually refers to the loss of a segment's normal voicing.
Among their topics are interjections as structured root expressions, parallelism and partial reconstruction of relative clauses, on the nature of word order regularities, language acquisition and the neuroscience of development, final devoicing in French, and the cross-linguistic homes of mood and tense.
Incorrect articulation of only affricates; plosives and fricatives; plosives, affricates and fricatives; affricates, fricatives and laterals (/l/,/lj/); affricates, fricatives and devoicing of nasals /m/, /n/, /nj/) were recorded in one patient only for each of these groups of sounds.
DELFORGE, Ann Marie 2012 "'Nobody wants to sound like a provinciano': The recession of unstressed vowel devoicing in the Spanish of Cusco, Peru".
57) If we grant an intuitive phonetic adjustment allowing for a standard pattern of Romance pronunciation--vocalic metathesis, devoicing of initial /g/, and lowering of final /i/--we have in Hebrew glturi the source of Old Spanish cultre.
Due to the general tendency towards final devoicing (see, for example, German Kind, pronounced kint, of a German immigrant to Israel pronouncing Negev as negef), Giulio often pronounced DAG as DAK.
1986), such as allophonic obstruent voicing and final sonorant devoicing, and it is identical across Mixean languages with some minor exceptions.
Their topics include social and phonetic conditioners on the frequency and degree of "intrusive /r/" in New Zealand English, the role of vowel elision and devoicing in rhythm types and the speech of working-class youth in a banlieue of Paris, regional stereotypes and the perception of Japanese vowel devoicing, the identification of African American speech, the perception of indexical features in children's speech, and aspects of the acoustic analysis of imitation.
Note that according to this hypothesis both voiced consonants of this root underwent devoicing in Akkadian (h > p and d > t).
Four specific AAE features were investigated: (a) regular past-tense inflection [ed], (b) postvocalic consonant reduction /t/ and /d/ in final position, (c) devoicing final consonant /d/, and (d) /[theta],[?