devoid


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de·void

 (dĭ-void′)
adj.
Completely lacking; destitute or empty: a novel devoid of wit and inventiveness.

[Middle English, past participle of devoiden, to remove, eliminate, from Old French desvoidier : des-, de- + voidier, to empty (from voide, empty; see void).]

devoid

(dɪˈvɔɪd)
adj
(foll by: of) destitute or void (of); free (from)
[C15: originally past participle of devoid (vb) to remove, from Old French devoidier, from de- de- + voider to void]

de•void

(dɪˈvɔɪd)

adj.
not possessing; totally lacking; destitute (usu. fol. by of).
[1350–1400; Middle English, orig. past participle of devoyden to drive out, empty < Old French desvuidier to empty out =des- dis-1 + vuidier to empty, void]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.devoid - completely wanting or lacking; "writing barren of insight"; "young recruits destitute of experience"; "innocent of literary merit"; "the sentence was devoid of meaning"
nonexistent - not having existence or being or actuality; "chimeras are nonexistent"

devoid

adjective (with of) lacking in, without, free from, wanting in, sans (archaic), bereft of, empty of, deficient in, denuded of, barren of I have never looked on a face so devoid of feeling.

devoid

adjective
Not having a desirable element:
Idiom: in want of.
Translations
خالٍ مِن
postrádajícízbavený
blottet forfri for
gjörsneyddur
neturintis
bezbrīvs
sızyoksun

devoid

[dɪˈvɔɪd] ADJ devoid ofdesprovisto de

devoid

[dɪˈvɔɪd] adj
devoid of → dépourvu(e) de, dénué(e) de

devoid

adj devoid ofbar +gen, → ohne

devoid

[dɪˈvɔɪd] adj devoid ofprivo/a di, senza

devoid

(diˈvoid) adjective
(with of) free from or lacking. That is devoid of any meaning.
References in classic literature ?
Devoid of parents, devoid of relations, devoid of flocks and herds, devoid of gold and silver and of precious stones.
The Gnat, having sounded his horn, fastened himself upon the Lion and stung him on the nostrils and the parts of the face devoid of hair.
Yet his style, for the most part devoid alike of artifice and art, almost baldly simple and direct, seems hardly compatible with the disingenuousness of a merely literary intention; one would call it the manner of one more concerned for the fruits of research than for the flowers of expression.
Gradgrind's bosom friend, as a man perfectly devoid of sentiment can approach that spiritual relationship towards another man perfectly devoid of sentiment.
The reader will here find no regions cursed with irremediable barrenness, or blessed with spontaneous fecundity, no perpetual gloom or unceasing sunshine; nor are the nations here described either devoid of all sense of humanity, or consummate in all private and social virtues; here are no Hottentots without religion, polity, or articulate language, no Chinese perfectly polite, and completely skilled in all sciences: he will discover, what will always be discovered by a diligent and impartial inquirer, that wherever human nature is to be found there is a mixture of vice and virtue, a contest of passion and reason, and that the Creator doth not appear partial in his distributions, but has balanced in most countries their particular inconveniences by particular favours.
Polygnotus delineates character well: the style of Zeuxis is devoid of ethical quality.
Such chapters as "The Child with the Mirror", "In the Happy Isles", "The Grave-Song," "Immaculate Perception," "The Stillest Hour", "The Seven Seals", and many others, are almost utterly devoid of meaning to all those who do not know something of Nietzsche's life, his aims and his friendships.
Evidently devoid of all the finer sentiments of friendship, love, or affection, these people fairly worship physical prowess and bravery, and nothing is too good for the object of their adoration as long as he maintains his position by repeated examples of his skill, strength, and courage.
Love is never quite devoid of sentimentality, and Strickland was the least inclined to that infirmity of any man I have known.
An ugly, thickly populated neighborhood, whose area of twinkling lights seemed to reach almost to the murky skies; hideous, indeed by day, not altogether devoid now of a certain weird attractiveness by reason of low-hung stars.
By the absence of refraction in the rays of the planets occulted by her we conclude that she is absolutely devoid of an atmosphere.
He was not ungenteel, nor entirely devoid of wit, and in his youth had abounded in sprightliness, which, though he had lately put on a more serious character, he could, when he pleased, resume.