devoid


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de·void

 (dĭ-void′)
adj.
Completely lacking; destitute or empty: a novel devoid of wit and inventiveness.

[Middle English, past participle of devoiden, to remove, eliminate, from Old French desvoidier : des-, de- + voidier, to empty (from voide, empty; see void).]

devoid

(dɪˈvɔɪd)
adj
(foll by: of) destitute or void (of); free (from)
[C15: originally past participle of devoid (vb) to remove, from Old French devoidier, from de- de- + voider to void]

de•void

(dɪˈvɔɪd)

adj.
not possessing; totally lacking; destitute (usu. fol. by of).
[1350–1400; Middle English, orig. past participle of devoyden to drive out, empty < Old French desvuidier to empty out =des- dis-1 + vuidier to empty, void]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.devoid - completely wanting or lacking; "writing barren of insight"; "young recruits destitute of experience"; "innocent of literary merit"; "the sentence was devoid of meaning"
nonexistent - not having existence or being or actuality; "chimeras are nonexistent"

devoid

adjective (with of) lacking in, without, free from, wanting in, sans (archaic), bereft of, empty of, deficient in, denuded of, barren of I have never looked on a face so devoid of feeling.

devoid

adjective
Not having a desirable element:
Idiom: in want of.
Translations
خالٍ مِن
postrádajícízbavený
blottet forfri for
gjörsneyddur
neturintis
bezbrīvs
sızyoksun

devoid

[dɪˈvɔɪd] ADJ devoid ofdesprovisto de

devoid

[dɪˈvɔɪd] adj
devoid of → dépourvu(e) de, dénué(e) de

devoid

adj devoid ofbar +gen, → ohne

devoid

[dɪˈvɔɪd] adj devoid ofprivo/a di, senza

devoid

(diˈvoid) adjective
(with of) free from or lacking. That is devoid of any meaning.
References in classic literature ?
They jeered and sounded mournful notes without promise, devoid even of hope.
As Heyward, however, no longer expected that rescue which time and distance now rendered so improbable, he regarded these little peculiarities with an eye devoid of interest, devoting himself entirely to the comfort and condolence of his feebler companions.
It is a good lesson -- though it may often be a hard one -- for a man who has dreamed of literary fame, and of making for himself a rank among the world's dignitaries by such means, to step aside out of the narrow circle in which his claims are recognized and to find how utterly devoid of significance, beyond that circle, is all that he achieves, and all he aims at.
The law regards him, in every respect, as devoid of rights as a bale of merchandise.
I am doatingly fond of musicpassionately fond;and my friends say I am not entirely devoid of taste; but as to any thing else, upon my honour my performance is mediocre to the last degree.
Reed might be at that time some six or seven and thirty; she was a woman of robust frame, square-shouldered and strong-limbed, not tall, and, though stout, not obese: she had a somewhat large face, the under jaw being much developed and very solid; her brow was low, her chin large and prominent, mouth and nose sufficiently regular; under her light eyebrows glimmered an eye devoid of ruth; her skin was dark and opaque, her hair nearly flaxen; her constitution was sound as a bell--illness never came near her; she was an exact, clever manager; her household and tenantry were thoroughly under her control; her children only at times defied her authority and laughed it to scorn; she dressed well, and had a presence and port calculated to set off handsome attire.
I began to doubt whether he were a servant or not: his dress and speech were both rude, entirely devoid of the superiority observable in Mr.
After he had taken a few turns backward and forward, alone, he was joined by a spare, quiet, gray-haired man, whose personal appearance was totally devoid of marked character of any kind; whose inexpressive face and conventionally-quiet manner presented nothing that attracted approval and nothing that inspired dislike.
The rugged eloquence with which he spoke, was not devoid of all effect.
so ran the questions, considerably devoid of auxiliary verbs and such details of construction.
Thus repuls'd, our final hope Is flat despair: we must exasperate Th' Almighty Victor to spend all his rage, And that must end us, that must be our cure, To be no more; sad cure; for who would loose, Though full of pain, this intellectual being, Those thoughts that wander through Eternity, To perish rather, swallowd up and lost In the wide womb of uncreated night, Devoid of sense and motion?
The reader will here find no regions cursed with irremediable barrenness, or blessed with spontaneous fecundity, no perpetual gloom or unceasing sunshine; nor are the nations here described either devoid of all sense of humanity, or consummate in all private and social virtues; here are no Hottentots without religion, polity, or articulate language, no Chinese perfectly polite, and completely skilled in all sciences: he will discover, what will always be discovered by a diligent and impartial inquirer, that wherever human nature is to be found there is a mixture of vice and virtue, a contest of passion and reason, and that the Creator doth not appear partial in his distributions, but has balanced in most countries their particular inconveniences by particular favours.