devolution


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dev·o·lu·tion

 (dĕv′ə-lo͞o′shən, dē′və-)
n.
1. A passing down or descent through successive stages of time or a process.
2. Transference, as of rights or qualities, to a successor.
3. Delegation of authority or duties to a subordinate or substitute.
4. A transfer of powers from a central government to local units.
5. Biology Degeneration.

[Late Latin dēvolūtiō, dēvolūtiōn-, from Latin dēvolūtus, past participle of dēvolvere, to roll down, fall to; see devolve.]

dev′o·lu′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.
dev′o·lu′tion·ist n.

devolution

(ˌdiːvəˈluːʃən)
n
1. the act, fact, or result of devolving
2. a passing onwards or downwards from one stage to another
3. (Biology) another word for degeneration3
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a transfer or allocation of authority, esp from a central government to regional governments or particular interests
[C16: from Medieval Latin dēvolūtiō a rolling down, from Latin dēvolvere to roll down, sink into; see devolve]
ˌdevoˈlutionary adj
ˌdevoˈlutionist n, adj

dev•o•lu•tion

(ˌdɛv əˈlu ʃən; esp. Brit. ˈdi və-)

n.
1. the act or fact of devolving; passage onward from stage to stage.
2. the passing on to a successor of property or an unexercised right.
3. disappearance or simplification of structure or function in the course of evolution.
4. the transfer of power or authority from a central government to a local government.
[1535–45; (< Middle French) < Medieval Latin dēvolūtiō; see devolve, revolution]
dev`o•lu′tion•ar′y, adj., n.
dev`o•lu′tion•ist, n.

devolution

- A passing down from stage to stage or the passing of property, rights, or authority from one person to another; it implies moving backward.
See also related terms for rights.

devolution

The transfer of power from a central government to smaller units such as regional authorities.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.devolution - the process of declining from a higher to a lower level of effective power or vitality or essential quality
physical process, process - a sustained phenomenon or one marked by gradual changes through a series of states; "events now in process"; "the process of calcification begins later for boys than for girls"
attack - the onset of a corrosive or destructive process (as by a chemical agent); "the film was sensitive to attack by acids"; "open to attack by the elements"
obsolescence - the process of becoming obsolete; falling into disuse or becoming out of date; "a policy of planned obsolescence"
macular degeneration - eye disease caused by degeneration of the cells of the macula lutea and results in blurred vision; can cause blindness
evolution, development - a process in which something passes by degrees to a different stage (especially a more advanced or mature stage); "the development of his ideas took many years"; "the evolution of Greek civilization"; "the slow development of her skill as a writer"
2.devolution - the delegation of authority (especially from a central to a regional government)
governing, government activity, government, governance, administration - the act of governing; exercising authority; "regulations for the governing of state prisons"; "he had considerable experience of government"
delegating, relegating, relegation, delegation, deputation - authorizing subordinates to make certain decisions

devolution

noun transfer of power, decentralization, distribution of power, surrender of power, relinquishment of power We are talking about devolution for Scotland.
Translations

devolution

[ˌdiːvəˈluːʃən] Ndelegación f (de poderes) (Pol) → traspaso m de competencias (Brit) (Pol) → descentralización f
most Welsh people want devolutionla mayoría de los galeses quieren la autonomía

devolution

[ˌdɛvəˈluːʃən ˌdiːvəˈluːʃən] ndécentralisation f

devolution

n
(of power)Übertragung f (→ from … to von … auf +acc); (Pol) → Dezentralisierung f
(Jur, of property, = active devolving) → Übertragung f; (= being devolved)Übergang m
(Biol) → Rückentwicklung f, → Degeneration f

devolution

[ˌdiːvəˈluːʃn] n (Pol) → decentramento

dev·o·lu·tion

n. devolución. V.: catabolism
References in classic literature ?
Felix, though an offshoot from a far more recent point in the devolution of theology than his father, was less self-sacrificing and disinterested.
The problem council leaders and other politicians have to wrestle with is what are the alternatives (if any) to the government's devolution proposals?
WHITEHALL'S model of devolution is too focussed on cities, meaning counties like Durham and Northumberland could lose out, new research suggests.
LOCAL Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) must keep a central role in the developing devolution landscape, if they are to realise the potential leverage of PS16 billion from private sector investors, and help business create 750,000 new jobs by 2021, the LEP Summit heard.
FORMER Prime Minister Tony Blair has admitted his government made a "mistake" by failing to do enough to ensure that devolution of powers to Scotland and Wales did not undermine the United Kingdom's national identity.
But their letter to Mr Clark confirmed they wish to begin detailed devolution negotiations and that they will alongside these discussions, consider appropriate models of governance, including an elected mayor.
ISLAMABAB -- Taking strong notice of misplacement of office audit record of various departments , the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) has directed the officials of Devolution cell to provide previous record within fifteen days to respective departments otherwise action would be taken .
And the reason I'm hopeful about the devolution journey is because I have a firm belief that the best people to make decisions about the Liverpool City Region are the people who live, work and do business here.
YOU SAY THE devolution of NHS services to Manchester, and thus most of Lancashire, is a continuation of the Labour policy of devolution.
Nunavut's premier is eyeing a devolution pact with the federal government which is a major stepping stone toward the eastern Arctic territory getting province-like powers over its land and resources.
William Hague has been accused of stitching up a deal to stop Scottish MPs voting on English issues at the expense of real devolution for the UK.
THE clock is ticking for English devolution after the Scottish referendum has let the "devolution genie out of the bottle," according to the chair of the Local Government Association.