dewclaw


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dew·claw

 (do͞o′klô′, dyo͞o′-)
n.
A short digit that does not reach the ground, found on the feet of dogs and certain other mammals.

[Perhaps dew + claw.]

dewclaw

(ˈdjuːˌklɔː)
n
1. (Zoology) a nonfunctional claw in dogs; the rudimentary first digit
2. (Zoology) an analogous rudimentary hoof in deer, goats, etc
ˈdewˌclawed adj

dew•claw

(ˈduˌklɔ, ˈdyu-)

n.
1. a functionless claw on some dogs that does not reach the ground in walking.
2. an analogous false hoof, as of deer.
[1570–80; compare dewlap]
dew′clawed`, adj.

dew·claw

(do͞o′klô′)
1. A small, useless, inner claw or toe in some dogs and other animals that does not reach the ground in walking.
2. The false hoof of deer, hogs, and other hoofed mammals, consisting of two toes.
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References in periodicals archive ?
He is the author of a recently published monograph entitled Voices of Thunder: A Case Study of Great Lakes Dewclaw Rattles (Spellicans Press, 2017).
Like the monk, this body gets a scent, but one that goes in a wilder direction--"redolent / As the retractile dewclaw on a lion's forepaw.
DEWCLAW CONSIDERATIONS: I wrapped nonadhesive moleskin around the leg, placing it under each dewclaw and securing it with a short piece of Vetrap.
They also have a claw on the inside of their front legs called a dewclaw, which acts somewhat like a thumb in gripping objects.
Scooby's dewclaw is inflamed because I put his bootie on wrong.
The red fox has five toes on its front paws--four in contact with the ground and a dewclaw on the back of each front leg--and it has four toes on the back paws, no dewclaws.
Among the iSCNT embryos generated using the cells of either Fp or Mp, the rate of blastocyst formation and the total number of cells at the blastocyst stage was significantly higher for embryos derived from dewclaw cells than for those derived from tail-tip cells.
Dewclaw removal is typically performed in conjunction with tail docking.
Dewclaw (doo-claw) A horny accessory digit on the back of the fetlock of many ruminant animals (see Figure 4-10) and pigs.
Some of the footprints are deep enough that they preserve the imprint of a vestigial toe, located in a position on the leg similar to that of a dog's dewclaw, says Kirkland.
A deer's dewclaw affixed to a worn moccasin marks it as footwear unique to these people.
Richard Green's newly published Voices of Thunder: A Case Study of Great Lakes Dewclaw Rattles gathers together all the known examples of these rare objects.