dewlap

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dew·lap

 (do͞o′lăp′, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1. A fold of loose skin hanging from the neck of certain animals.
2. A pendulous part similar to this, such as the wattle of a bird.
3. A fold of loose skin hanging from the neck of a person.

[Middle English dewlappe : dew, of unknown meaning (akin to Danish and Norwegian dog- in Danish doglæb and Norwegian doglæp, dewlap) + lappe, fold; see lap2.]

dewlap

(ˈdjuːˌlæp)
n
1. (Anatomy) a loose fold of skin hanging from beneath the throat in cattle, dogs, etc
2. (Anatomy) loose skin on an elderly person's throat
[C14 dewlappe, from dew (probably changed by folk etymology from an earlier form of different meaning) + lap1 (from Old English læppa hanging flap), perhaps of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish doglæp]
ˈdewˌlapped adj

dew•lap

(ˈduˌlæp, ˈdyu-)

n.
1. a pendulous fold of skin under the throat of a bovine animal.
2. any similar part in other animals, as the wattle of fowl or the inflatable loose skin under the throat of some lizards.
[1350–1400]
dew′lapped`, adj.

dew·lap

(do͞o′lăp′)
A loose fold of skin hanging from the neck of certain animals, such as some dogs or cattle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dewlap - a hanging fold of loose skin on an elderly person's neck
cutis, skin, tegument - a natural protective body covering and site of the sense of touch; "your skin is the largest organ of your body"
cervix, neck - the part of an organism (human or animal) that connects the head to the rest of the body; "he admired her long graceful neck"; "the horse won by a neck"
Translations

dewlap

[ˈdjuːlæp] Npapada f
References in classic literature ?
The Demoiselle Irene Dewlap, of South Astolat, is visiting her uncle, the popular host of the Cattlemen's Board- ing House, Liver Lane, this city.
Fire burst from its open mouth, its eyes glowed with a smouldering glare, its muzzle and hackles and dewlap were outlined in flickering flame.
We saw his grizzled mustache, the bald spot on his head, the puff-sacks under his eyes, the sagging cheeks, the heavy dewlap, the general tiredness and staleness and fatness, all the collapse and ruin of a man who had once been strong but who had lived too easily and too well.