diacetyl


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

diacetyl

(ˌdaɪəˈsiːtəl)
n
a chemical compound with formula C4H6O2, occurring naturally as a by-product of fermentation, and commonly added to margarine and other foods because of its buttery taste
References in periodicals archive ?
It is a split-second combination of a specific olfactory receptor in your nose smelling the buttered popcorn chemical, called diacetyl, which causes the nervous system to activate a cell that travels a pre-determined pathway directly to your brain.
Diacetyl can cause irreversible obstructive lung disease.
They include recognised carcinogen formaldehyde, acrolein - a toxin and irritant to the eyes, skin and nose - and diacetyl, which can cause breathing problems.
Wen, Formyl Fusarochromanone and Diacetyl Fusarochromanone, Two New Metabolites of Fusarium equiseti, J.
Allen and colleagues (2016) performed a toxicology study of a sampling of ENDS and found undetectable amounts of diacetyl to 239 mcg/cig vs.
The diluents present in taste and flavor additives include benzoic alcohol and diacetyl (2,3-butadione), compounds which promote significant changes in the mitotic spindle and cell division of human peripheral blood cells (Demir, Kocaoglu, & Kaya, 2010) and significant damage to the chromosome 11 locus of rodents, causing loss of expression of essential genes controlling cell division (Whittaker, Clarke, San, Begley, & Dunkel, 2008), respectively.
At the beginning of the year 2000, diacetyl was associated with a disease named "Popcorn Lung".
In turn, a gene mutation assay in rat lymphoma showed that the diluent diacetyl (2,3-butadione) caused significant damage to loci of the chromosome 11 of these cells, causing loss of expression of the genes for thymidine kinase enzyme (Whittaker et al.
They typically contain an "e-liquid" that is made up of nicotine, a flavored chemical known as Diacetyl and other chemicals, (http://www.
Severe airway epithelial injury, aberrant repair and bronchiolitis obliterans develops after diacetyl instillation in rats.
Probiotics inhibit the growth of many microorganisms by producing lactic and acetic acid, bacteriocins, hydrogen peroxide, diacetyl, acetaldehyde and ammonia (1,4,18)).