diachronic

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Related to diachronistic: synchronically

di·a·chron·ic

 (dī′ə-krŏn′ĭk)
adj.
Of or concerned with phenomena, such as linguistic features, as they change through time.

[From dia- + Greek khronos, time.]

di′a·chron′i·cal·ly adv.

diachronic

(ˌdaɪəˈkrɒnɪk) or

diachronistic

adj
of, relating to, or studying the development of a phenomenon through time; historical: diachronic linguistics. Compare synchronic
[C19: from dia- + Greek khronos time]

di•a•chron•ic

(ˌdaɪ əˈkrɒn ɪk)

adj.
of or pertaining to the study of the changes in a language over a period of time: diachronic linguistics. Compare synchronic.
[1925–30; < French diachronique (French. de Saussure); see dia-, chronic]
di`a•chron′i•cal•ly, adv.

diachronic

Used to describe the study of the development of a language over time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.diachronic - used of the study of a phenomenon (especially language) as it changes through time; "diachronic linguistics"
language, linguistic communication - a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"
synchronic - concerned with phenomena (especially language) at a particular period without considering historical antecedents; "synchronic linguistics"
Translations

diachronic

[ˌdaɪəˈkrɒnɪk] ADJdiacrónico

diachronic

adjdiachron
References in periodicals archive ?
Compelling points are made about how time works against the essential topicality of satire and how this dilemma of the synchronistic and the diachronistic vexes Swift.
His diachronistic evaluation of feminine women came down to the size of my feet I was Bozo'd baby feminine women said he, are truly bound to the earth your great great great grandmother had the smallest tootsies in the region I only saw a black and white version of the gnarled and twisted perfection Her clawed foot?
The two last chapters are devoted to diachronistic problems.