dialect


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

di·a·lect

 (dī′ə-lĕkt′)
n.
1.
a. A regional or social variety of a language distinguished by pronunciation, grammar, or vocabulary, especially a variety of speech differing from the standard literary language or speech pattern of the culture in which it exists: Cockney is a dialect of English.
b. A variety of language that with other varieties constitutes a single language of which no single variety is standard: the dialects of Ancient Greek.
2. The language peculiar to the members of a group, especially in an occupation; jargon: the dialect of science.
3. The manner or style of expressing oneself in language or the arts.
4. A language considered as part of a larger family of languages or a linguistic branch. Not in scientific use: Spanish and French are Romance dialects.

[French dialecte, from Old French, from Latin dialectus, form of speech, from Greek dialektos, speech, from dialegesthai, to discourse, use a dialect : dia-, between, over; see dia- + legesthai, middle voice of legein, to speak; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

di′a·lec′tal adj.
di′a·lec′tal·ly adv.

dialect

(ˈdaɪəˌlɛkt)
n
(Linguistics)
a. a form of a language spoken in a particular geographical area or by members of a particular social class or occupational group, distinguished by its vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation
b. a form of a language that is considered inferior: the farmer spoke dialect and was despised by the merchants.
c. (as modifier): a dialect word.
[C16: from Latin dialectus, from Greek dialektos speech, dialect, discourse, from dialegesthai to converse, from legein to talk, speak]
ˌdiaˈlectal adj

di•a•lect

(ˈdaɪ əˌlɛkt)

n.
1. a variety of a language distinguished from other varieties by features of phonology, grammar, and vocabulary and by its use by a group of speakers set off from others geographically or socially.
2. a provincial, rural, or socially distinct variety of a language that differs from the standard language.
3. any special variety of a language: the literary dialect.
4. a language considered as one of a group that have a common ancestor: Persian, Latin, and English are Indo-European dialects.
[1545–55; < Latin dialectus < Greek diálektos discourse, language, dialect, n. derivative of dialégesthai to converse (dia- dia- + légein to speak)]
syn: See language.

dialect

a variety of a language peculiar to a particular region or group within a larger community, usually but not always existing in the spoken form only. — dialectal, adj.
See also: Linguistics

dialect

1. A form of a language used in a particular region or by a particular group of people.
2. Any of several versions of BASIC using slightly different commands.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dialect - the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of peopledialect - the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people; "the immigrants spoke an odd dialect of English"; "he has a strong German accent"; "it has been said that a language is a dialect with an army and navy"
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
eye dialect - the use of misspellings to identify a colloquial or uneducated speaker
patois - a regional dialect of a language (especially French); usually considered substandard
spang, bang - leap, jerk, bang; "Bullets spanged into the trees"
forrad, forrard, forward, forwards, frontward, frontwards - at or to or toward the front; "he faced forward"; "step forward"; "she practiced sewing backward as well as frontward on her new sewing machine"; (`forrad' and `forrard' are dialectal variations)

dialect

noun language, speech, tongue, jargon, idiom, vernacular, brogue, lingo (informal), patois, provincialism, localism the number of Italians who speak only local dialect
Quotations
"Dialect words - those terrible marks of the beast to the truly genteel" [Thomas Hardy The Mayor of Casterbridge]

dialect

noun
1. A variety of a language that differs from the standard form:
2. A system of terms used by a people sharing a history and culture:
Linguistics: langue.
3. Specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture:
Translations
لهجةلَهْجَةلَهْجَه، لُغَه مَحَلِّيَّه
диалект
dialecte
nářečí
dialekt
لحجه
murrealuemurre
narječjedijalekt
nyelvjárástájszólás
dialek
mállýskamállÿska
方言
방언사투리
dialectosdialectus
dialektastarmė
dialektsizloksne
nárečie
narečje
dialekt
ภาษาท้องถิ่น
tiếng địa phương

dialect

[ˈdaɪəlekt]
A. Ndialecto m
B. CPD dialect atlas Natlas m inv lingüístico
dialect survey Nestudio m dialectológico
dialect word Ndialectalismo m

dialect

[ˈdaɪəlɛkt] ndialecte m
in dialect → en dialectedialling code n (British)indicatif mdialling tone n (British)tonalité fdialog box dialogue box n (COMPUTING)boîte f de dialogue

dialect

nDialekt m; (local, rural also) → Mundart f; the country people spoke in dialectdie Landbevölkerung sprach Dialekt; the play is in dialectdas Stück ist in Dialekt or Mundart geschrieben
attrDialekt-; dialect wordDialektausdruck m

dialect

[ˈdaɪəˌlɛkt] ndialetto
the local dialect → il dialetto del luogo
dialect word → termine m dialettale

dialect

(ˈdaiəlekt) noun
a way of speaking found only in a certain area or among a certain group or class of people. They were speaking in dialect.

dialect

لَهْجَة nářečí dialekt Dialekt διάλεκτος dialecto murre dialecte narječje dialetto 方言 방언 dialect dialekt dialekt dialeto диалект dialekt ภาษาท้องถิ่น lehçe tiếng địa phương 方言
References in classic literature ?
You may start, Senor Jacinto," said the professor, and the guide called something in Indian dialect to the rowers.
I see in my mind a herd of wild creatures swarming over the earth, and to each the herdsman has affixed some barbarous sound in his own dialect.
You speak my dialect like a native, but you are not a Mexican Plug, you are a gentleman, I can see that; and educated, of course.
And possibly the raftsmen's dialect was what is called PLATT-DEUTSCH, and so they found his English more familiar to their ears than another man's German.
He could neither read nor write, and his speech was the basest dialect of the Negro quarter.
When he had identified these objects in what benighted mind he had, he said, in a dialect that was just intelligible:
I knew this meant, in our local dialect, like two young thrushes, and received it as a compliment.
Scottish manners, Scottish dialect, and Scottish characters of note, being those with which the author was most intimately, and familiarly acquainted, were the groundwork upon which he had hitherto relied for giving effect to his narrative.
cried Smilash, ecstatically breaking into the outrageous dialect he had forgotten in his wrath.
At length one of them called out in a clear, polite, smooth dialect, not unlike in sound to the Italian: and therefore I returned an answer in that language, hoping at least that the cadence might be more agreeable to his ears.
I say nothing of the possible danger if a Woman should ever surreptitiously learn to read and convey to her Sex the result of her perusal of a single popular volume; nor of the possibility that the indiscretion or disobedience of some infant Male might reveal to a Mother the secrets of the logical dialect.
I nodded, for I thought it better to assent, though I did not quite understand his dialect.