dialectally


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Related to dialectally: Dialectical reasoning

di·a·lect

 (dī′ə-lĕkt′)
n.
1.
a. A regional or social variety of a language distinguished by pronunciation, grammar, or vocabulary, especially a variety of speech differing from the standard literary language or speech pattern of the culture in which it exists: Cockney is a dialect of English.
b. A variety of language that with other varieties constitutes a single language of which no single variety is standard: the dialects of Ancient Greek.
2. The language peculiar to the members of a group, especially in an occupation; jargon: the dialect of science.
3. The manner or style of expressing oneself in language or the arts.
4. A language considered as part of a larger family of languages or a linguistic branch. Not in scientific use: Spanish and French are Romance dialects.

[French dialecte, from Old French, from Latin dialectus, form of speech, from Greek dialektos, speech, from dialegesthai, to discourse, use a dialect : dia-, between, over; see dia- + legesthai, middle voice of legein, to speak; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

di′a·lec′tal adj.
di′a·lec′tal·ly adv.

dialectally

(ˌdaɪəˈlɛktəlɪ)
adv
(Phonetics & Phonology) in a dialectal manner
References in periodicals archive ?
Implicitly it would appear that Corriente likens the Andalusian texts to contemporary spoken Arabic, Terence Mitchell's (1986) "educated spoken Arabic" for instance, wherein a dialectally based discourse is interpunctuated with loans from Standard Arabic.
Several dialectally impure texts (8) representing the East or West Midland region and labelled by the Innsbruck Corpus editors as having mixed origin were also considered in the examination.
David is one of the most fragile and vulnerably complicated, contradictory and dialectally interesting characters in our shared tradition, and yet look at how important he is in our traditions: the ancestor of the Messiah, the founder of Zion.
Indeed, as Lyster (2011, 617) states, CBI and FonF "are best seen as complementary pairs that interact dialectally to foster a dynamic interplay between communication and reflection on that communication.
One side of the dichotomy is dialectally acting in relation to the other.
It can be useful to view cultural systems dialectally, for example inclusive v.
The case-study of the madman Pierre is presented dialectally by means of variable focalization.
While not used in standard Italian, deferential voi was widespread in the first half of the 20th century and still occurs dialectally.