dialectical


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di·a·lec·tic

 (dī′ə-lĕk′tĭk)
n.
1. The art or practice of arriving at the truth by the exchange of logical arguments.
2. The process especially associated with Hegel of arriving at the truth by stating a thesis, developing a contradictory antithesis, and combining and resolving them into a coherent synthesis.
3. often dialectics(used with a sing. or pl. verb) The Marxian process of change through the conflict of opposing forces, whereby a given contradiction is characterized by a primary and a secondary aspect, the secondary succumbing to the primary, which is then transformed into an aspect of a new contradiction.
4. dialectics(used with a sing. verb) A method of argument or exposition that systematically weighs contradictory facts or ideas with a view to the resolution of their real or apparent contradictions.
5. The contradiction between two conflicting forces viewed as the determining factor in their continuing interaction.

[Middle English dialetik, from Old French dialetique, from Latin dialectica, logic, from Greek dialektikē (tekhnē), (art) of debate, feminine of dialektikos, from dialektos, speech, conversation; see dialect.]

di′a·lec′ti·cal, di′a·lec′tic adj.
di′a·lec′ti·cal·ly adv.

dialectical

(ˌdaɪəˈlɛktɪkəl)
adj
(Philosophy) of or relating to dialectic or dialectics
ˌdiaˈlectically adv

di•a•lec•tic

(ˌdaɪ əˈlɛk tɪk)

adj. Also, dialectical.
1. pertaining to or of the nature of logical argumentation.
n.
3. the art or practice of debate or conversation by which the truth of a theory or opinion is arrived at logically.
4. logical argumentation.
6. dialectics, (often used with a sing. v.) the arguments or bases of dialectical materialism, including the elevation of matter over mind and a constantly changing reality with a material basis.
7. the juxtaposition or interaction of conflicting ideas, forces, etc.
[1350–1400; (< Anglo-French) < Latin dialectica < Greek dialektikḗ (téchnē) argumentative (art), feminine of dialektikós. See dialect, -ic]
di`a•lec′ti•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dialectical - of or relating to or employing dialectic; "the dialectical method"
Translations

dialectical

[ˌdaɪəˈlektɪkəl]
A. ADJdialéctico
B. CPD dialectical materialism Nmaterialismo m dialéctico

dialectical

adjdialektisch; dialectical materialismdialektischer Materialismus

dialectical

[ˌdaɪəˈlɛktɪkl] adjdialettico/a
References in classic literature ?
Things that sound contradictory should be examined by the same rules as in dialectical refutation whether the same thing is meant, in the same relation, and in the same sense.
Casaubon; digestion was made difficult by the interference of citations, or by the rivalry of dialectical phrases ringing against each other in his brain.
Socrates is of opinion that the more abstract or dialectical definition of figure is far better.
For the rest, he thought the dialectical part of his argument of little worth; he saw only too clearly that the result of these ecstatic moments was stupefaction, mental darkness, idiocy.
Cinema and Its Discontents: The Dialectical Nature of Character
Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based treatment originally developed and evaluated for individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD), endorsing histories of multiple nonfatal suicidal behaviors (Linehan, 1993).
00--This is a book about Hegel--specifically, about Hegelian dialectics--organized around two primary claims: that there exists a link between Hegel and the philosophical practices of the medieval period, when the distinct dialectical form of identity and difference first takes shape; and that what goes by the name of "theory" today in the humanities owes more than is generally recognized to Hegel's "daring extension of the medieval discipline of dialectic into modernity.
The newly confirmed [1] existence of the Majorana particle is an affirmation of this dialectical law and at the same time it is a negation of the (artificial) division into the absolute and the unitary categories of the fundamental particles in nature as bosons and fermions.
00 of the 90 day treatment at the Meehl Foundation Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) residential program.
In a penetrating analysis, the first of its kind, "Dialectical Theology and Jacques Ellul" provides a substantive account of the theological structure of Ellul's work and demonstrates the determinative role that theology, especially dialectical theology, plays in a proper understanding of Ellul.
The dialectical behavior therapy primer; how DBT can inform clinical practice.
The author attempts to explain the reasons for their conflicting ideas on the issue by addressing the influence of cultural background on dialectical thinking.