diamagnetism


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Related to diamagnetism: paramagnetism

di·a·mag·net·ic

 (dī′ə-măg-nĕt′ĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to a substance that generates a magnetic field in the direction opposite to an externally applied magnetic field and is therefore repelled by it.

di′a·mag′ne·tism (-nĭ-tĭz′əm) n.

diamagnetism

(ˌdaɪəˈmæɡnɪˌtɪzəm)
n
(General Physics) the phenomenon exhibited by substances that have a relative permeability less than unity and a negative susceptibility. It is caused by the orbital motion of electrons in the atoms of the material and is unaffected by temperature. Compare ferromagnetism, paramagnetism

diamagnetism

a property of certain materials of being repelled by both poles of a magnet, thus taking a position at right angles to the magnet’s lines of influence.
See also: Physics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diamagnetism - phenomenon exhibited by materials like copper or bismuth that become magnetized in a magnetic field with a polarity opposite to the magnetic forcediamagnetism - phenomenon exhibited by materials like copper or bismuth that become magnetized in a magnetic field with a polarity opposite to the magnetic force; unlike iron they are slightly repelled by a magnet
magnetic attraction, magnetic force, magnetism - attraction for iron; associated with electric currents as well as magnets; characterized by fields of force
References in periodicals archive ?
Diamagnetism is a property of some materials such as graphite that causes them to levitate in a stable manner in a magnetic field without power.
After a short reflection on the cultural import of levitation ranging from Harry Potter and Houdini to ninjas, yogis and 16th century Catholic saints, he settles in to describe the fundamental science of magnetism, gravity, force fields, stabilization, diamagnetism, superdiamagnetism, and maglev nanotechnology; key figures in their discovery and development; and the fascinating depth and breadth of technology based on these processes (levitating frogs and 360 mile per hour trains feature prominently), as well as exactly how it all works.
Chapters cover the basics of magnetism and magnetic materials including the definitions and units of measurement, experimental methods, ferromagnetism, diamagnetism and fine particles and thin films.