diamondback

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diamondback

(ˈdaɪəməndˌbæk)
n
1. (Animals) Also called: diamondback terrapin or diamondback turtle any edible North American terrapin of the genus Malaclemys, esp M. terrapin, occurring in brackish and tidal waters and having diamond-shaped markings on the shell: family Emydidae
2. (Animals) a large North American rattlesnake, Crotalus adamanteus, having cream-and-grey diamond-shaped markings

dia•mond•back

(ˈdaɪ məndˌbæk, ˈdaɪ ə-)

adj.
1. bearing diamond-shaped marks on the back.
n.
2. either of two large venomous rattlesnakes of the genus Crotalus having diamond-shaped markings on the back, C. adamanteus of the southeastern U.S., and C. atrox of the western U.S. and Mexico.
[1810–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diamondback - large deadly rattlesnake with diamond-shaped markingsdiamondback - large deadly rattlesnake with diamond-shaped markings
rattler, rattlesnake - pit viper with horny segments at the end of the tail that rattle when shaken
References in periodicals archive ?
This vaccine was created specifically against venom from Western Diamondback rattlesnakes and is most effective against this snake's venom, but since venom from many other rattlesnakes is similar, this vaccine may also provide protection against venoms of the Prairie rattlesnake, Great Basic rattlesnake, Northern and Southern Pacific varieties, Sidewinder, Timber rattlesnake, Massasauga, and Copperhead.
You're far safer dealing with crocodiles and western diamondback rattlesnakes than the executives and the producers and all those sharks in the big MGM building.
Diamondback rattlesnakes are indigenous to our part of southern Idaho.
The four poisonous snakes found throughout most of the peninsula are diamondback rattlesnakes, pigmy rattlesnakes, water moccasins and coral snakes.
It is unforgiving territory, and home to wild horses, boar, scorpions and diamondback rattlesnakes.
The group's campaign to outlaw "rattlesnake round-ups"-contests whereby hunters collect and kill as many snakes as they can in a year--has helped stem population declines of eastern diamondback rattlesnakes.
Discrimination between envenomated and nonenvenomated prey by western diamondback rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox): Chemosensory consequences of venom.
They sat in two separate tubs, each with 75 Western Diamondback rattlesnakes, on the set of Guinness World Records: Primetime.