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di·a·mond

 (dī′ə-mənd, dī′mənd)
n.
1. An extremely hard, highly refractive crystalline form of carbon that is usually colorless and is used as a gemstone and in abrasives, cutting tools, and other applications.
2. A piece of jewelry containing such a gemstone.
3. A rhombus, particularly when oriented so that one of its diagonals is vertical and the other is horizontal.
4. Games
a. A red, lozenge-shaped figure on certain playing cards.
b. A playing card with this figure.
c. diamonds (used with a sing. or pl. verb) The suit of cards represented by this figure.
5. Baseball
a. The infield.
b. The whole playing field.
adj.
Of or relating to a 60th or 75th anniversary.
tr.v. di·a·mond·ed, di·a·mond·ing, di·a·monds
To adorn with diamonds.
Idiom:
diamond in the rough
One having exceptionally good qualities or the potential for greatness but lacking polish and refinement.

[Middle English diamaunt, from Old French diamant, from Medieval Latin diamās, diamant-, alteration of Latin adamās; see adamant.]

diamond

(ˈdaɪəmənd)
n
1. (Minerals)
a. a colourless exceptionally hard mineral (but often tinted yellow, orange, blue, brown, or black by impurities), found in certain igneous rocks (esp the kimberlites of South Africa). It is used as a gemstone, as an abrasive, and on the working edges of cutting tools. Composition: carbon. Formula: C. Crystal structure: cubic
b. (as modifier): a diamond ring. diamantine
2. (Jewellery)
a. a colourless exceptionally hard mineral (but often tinted yellow, orange, blue, brown, or black by impurities), found in certain igneous rocks (esp the kimberlites of South Africa). It is used as a gemstone, as an abrasive, and on the working edges of cutting tools. Composition: carbon. Formula: C. Crystal structure: cubic
b. (as modifier): a diamond ring. diamantine
3. (Mathematics) geometry
a. a figure having four sides of equal length forming two acute angles and two obtuse angles; rhombus
b. (modifier) rhombic
4. (Card Games)
a. a red lozenge-shaped symbol on a playing card
b. a card with one or more of these symbols or (when plural) the suit of cards so marked
5. (Baseball) baseball
a. the whole playing field
b. the square formed by the four bases
6. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (formerly) a size of printer's type approximately equal to 4 point
7. (Minerals) black diamond a figurative name for coal
8. (Minerals) an unpolished diamond
9. a person of fine character who lacks refinement and polish
vb
(Jewellery) (tr) to decorate with or as with diamonds
[C13: from Old French diamant, from Medieval Latin diamas, modification of Latin adamas the hardest iron or steel, diamond; see adamant]
ˈdiamond-ˌlike adj

dia•mond

(ˈdaɪ mənd, ˈdaɪ ə-)

n.
1. a pure or nearly pure, extremely hard form of carbon crystallized in the isometric system.
2. a piece of this substance.
3. a transparent, flawless or almost flawless piece of this mineral, esp. when cut and polished, valued as a precious gem.
4. a piece of jewelry containing a diamond.
5. a piece of this mineral used in a drill or cutting tool.
6. an equilateral quadrilateral, esp. as placed with its diagonals vertical and horizontal.
7. a red rhombus-shaped figure on a playing card.
8. a card bearing such figures.
9. diamonds, (used with a sing. or pl. v.) the suit so marked.
10.
a. the infield in baseball.
b. the entire playing field.
adj.
11. made of or set with diamonds.
12. having the shape of a diamond.
13. indicating the 60th or 75th event of a series, as a wedding anniversary.
v.t.
14. to adorn with or as if with diamonds.
Idioms:
diamond in the rough, a person or thing of inherent but uncultivated worth.
[1275–1325; < Old French]

Dia•mond

(ˈdaɪ mənd, ˈdaɪ ə-)

n.

di·a·mond

(dī′ə-mənd)
A form of pure carbon that occurs naturally as a clear crystal and is the hardest of all known minerals. It is used as a gemstone in its finer varieties. Poorly crystallized diamonds are used in abrasives and in industrial cutting tools. See Note at carbon.

diamond

- Developed from adamant—the name of the hardest stone or mineral of ancient times—from Latin adamans, from Greek adamas, "invincible" (a-, "not," and daman, "to tame").
See also related terms for mineral.

diamond


Past participle: diamonded
Gerund: diamonding

Imperative
diamond
diamond
Present
I diamond
you diamond
he/she/it diamonds
we diamond
you diamond
they diamond
Preterite
I diamonded
you diamonded
he/she/it diamonded
we diamonded
you diamonded
they diamonded
Present Continuous
I am diamonding
you are diamonding
he/she/it is diamonding
we are diamonding
you are diamonding
they are diamonding
Present Perfect
I have diamonded
you have diamonded
he/she/it has diamonded
we have diamonded
you have diamonded
they have diamonded
Past Continuous
I was diamonding
you were diamonding
he/she/it was diamonding
we were diamonding
you were diamonding
they were diamonding
Past Perfect
I had diamonded
you had diamonded
he/she/it had diamonded
we had diamonded
you had diamonded
they had diamonded
Future
I will diamond
you will diamond
he/she/it will diamond
we will diamond
you will diamond
they will diamond
Future Perfect
I will have diamonded
you will have diamonded
he/she/it will have diamonded
we will have diamonded
you will have diamonded
they will have diamonded
Future Continuous
I will be diamonding
you will be diamonding
he/she/it will be diamonding
we will be diamonding
you will be diamonding
they will be diamonding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been diamonding
you have been diamonding
he/she/it has been diamonding
we have been diamonding
you have been diamonding
they have been diamonding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been diamonding
you will have been diamonding
he/she/it will have been diamonding
we will have been diamonding
you will have been diamonding
they will have been diamonding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been diamonding
you had been diamonding
he/she/it had been diamonding
we had been diamonding
you had been diamonding
they had been diamonding
Conditional
I would diamond
you would diamond
he/she/it would diamond
we would diamond
you would diamond
they would diamond
Past Conditional
I would have diamonded
you would have diamonded
he/she/it would have diamonded
we would have diamonded
you would have diamonded
they would have diamonded

diamond

Nickname for the infield.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diamond - a transparent piece of diamond that has been cut and polished and is valued as a precious gemdiamond - a transparent piece of diamond that has been cut and polished and is valued as a precious gem
jewel, precious stone, gem - a precious or semiprecious stone incorporated into a piece of jewelry
sparkler, ice - diamonds; "look at the ice on that dame!"
2.diamond - very hard native crystalline carbon valued as a gemdiamond - very hard native crystalline carbon valued as a gem
atomic number 6, carbon, C - an abundant nonmetallic tetravalent element occurring in three allotropic forms: amorphous carbon and graphite and diamond; occurs in all organic compounds
black diamond, carbonado - an inferior dark diamond used in industry for drilling and polishing
transparent gem - a gemstone having the property of transmitting light without serious diffusion
3.diamond - a parallelogram with four equal sidesdiamond - a parallelogram with four equal sides; an oblique-angled equilateral parallelogram
parallelogram - a quadrilateral whose opposite sides are both parallel and equal in length
4.diamond - a playing card in the minor suit that has one or more red rhombuses on it; "he led a small diamond"; "diamonds were trumps"
minor suit - ( bridge) a suit of inferior scoring value, either diamonds or clubs
playing card - one of a pack of cards that are used to play card games
5.diamond - the area of a baseball field that is enclosed by 3 bases and home platediamond - the area of a baseball field that is enclosed by 3 bases and home plate
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
ball field, baseball field, diamond - the baseball playing field
bag, base - a place that the runner must touch before scoring; "he scrambled to get back to the bag"
batter's box - an area on a baseball diamond (on either side of home plate) marked by lines within which the batter must stand when at bat
mound, pitcher's mound, hill - (baseball) the slight elevation on which the pitcher stands
short - the location on a baseball field where the shortstop is stationed
6.diamond - the baseball playing fielddiamond - the baseball playing field    
ballpark, park - a facility in which ball games are played (especially baseball games); "take me out to the ballpark"
baseball diamond, infield, diamond - the area of a baseball field that is enclosed by 3 bases and home plate
box - any one of several designated areas on a ball field where the batter or catcher or coaches are positioned; "the umpire warned the batter to stay in the batter's box"
outfield - the area of a baseball playing field beyond the lines connecting the bases
athletic field, playing area, playing field, field - a piece of land prepared for playing a game; "the home crowd cheered when Princeton took the field"
foul line - lines through 1st and 3rd base indicating the boundaries of a baseball field

diamond

noun
Related words
adjective diamantine
Translations
ديناريرَأْس إبْرَة جِهاز التَّسْجيلشَكل الماسَهماسماس، ألماس
diamantkosočtverecdiamantovýkáro
diamantruderrhombe
teemant
timanttivinoneliöruutu
dijamant
gyémántkárótök
demanturtígulltígullaga formdemantsnál
ダイヤモンドひし形
금강석다이아몬드
būgnaibūgnasdeimantasdeimantinė galvutėrombas
briljanta-briljantsdimanta-dimanta galviņadimants
diamantinleggen met diamantruit
diamantdiamantovýkáro
diamantkaro
diamantrombruterbrilliant
เพชรสี่เหลี่ยมขนมเปียกปูน
elmaskarobaklava biçimi
hình thoikim cương

diamond

[ˈdaɪəmənd]
A. N
1. (= mineral) → diamante m; (= jewel) → brillante m, diamante m
diamond cut diamondtal para cual
2. (= shape) → rombo m
3. (Cards) (= standard pack) → diamante m; (Spanish cards) → oro m diamonds (= suit) → diamantes mpl; (in Spanish pack) → oros mpl
the Queen of diamondsla dama or reina de diamantes
4. (Baseball) → campo m de béisbol
B. CPD diamond jubilee Nsexagésimo aniversario m
diamond merchant Ncomerciante mf en diamantes
diamond mine Nmina f de diamantes
diamond necklace Ncollar m de diamantes
diamond ring Nanillo m de diamantes, sortija f de diamantes
diamond wedding (anniversary) Nbodas fpl de diamante

diamond

[ˈdaɪəmənd]
n
(= precious stone) → diamant m
(= shape) → losange m diamonds
npl (CARDS)carreau m
the king of diamonds → le roi de carreau
modif [bracelet, brooch, earrings] → en diamant
diamond ring → bague f en diamant(s)diamond jubilee n(célébration f du) soixantième anniversaire m (d'un événement important)diamond wedding nnoces fpl de diamant

diamond

n
diamonds pl (Cards) → Karo nt; the ace/seven of diamondsdas Karoass/die Karosieben
(Baseball) → Innenfeld nt
(Math: = rhombus) → Raute f

diamond

in cpdsDiamant-; diamond braceletDiamantarmband nt;
diamond cutter
nDiamantschneider(in) m(f); (Ind) → Diamantschleifer(in) m(f)
diamond cutting
nDiamantschleifen nt
diamond drill
diamond jubilee
n60-jähriges Jubiläum
diamond lane
n (US) mit Raute gekennzeichnete Fahrspur, auf der nur Busse, Taxis und Privatautos mit mehr als einem Insassen fahren dürfen
diamond merchant
nDiamantenhändler(in) m(f)
diamond-shaped
diamond wedding

diamond

[ˈdaɪəmənd]
1. n
a. (stone) → diamante m, brillante m; (shape) → rombo, losanga
b. (Cards) diamonds nplquadri mpl
the Queen of diamonds → la donna di quadri
2. adj (necklace) → di diamanti or brillanti
diamond ring → anello di brillanti (with single diamond) → anello con brillante
diamond-shaped → a forma di losanga

diamond

(ˈdaiəmənd) noun
1. a very hard, colourless precious stone. Her brooch had three diamonds in it; (also adjective) a diamond ring.
2. a piece of diamond (often artificial) used as a tip on eg a record-player stylus.
3. a kind of four-sided figure or shape; ♢. There was a pattern of red and yellow diamonds on the floor.
4. one of the playing-cards of the suit diamonds, which have red symbols of this shape on them.
ˈdiamonds noun plural
(sometimes treated as noun singular) one of the four card suits. the five of diamonds.

diamond

ماس, مُعَيـَّن diamant, kosočtverec diamant, ruder Diamant, Raute διαμάντι diamante, rombo timantti, vinoneliö diamant, losange dijamant diamante, rombo ダイヤモンド, ひし形 금강석, 다이아몬드 diamant diamant diament, romb diamante алмаз, ромб diamant, romb เพชร, สี่เหลี่ยมขนมเปียกปูน elmas hình thoi, kim cương 菱形, 钻石
References in classic literature ?
There was the garnet set which Aunt March wore when she came out, the pearls her father gave her on her wedding day, her lover's diamonds, the jet mourning rings and pins, the queer lockets, with portraits of dead friends and weeping willows made of hair inside, the baby bracelets her one little daughter had worn, Uncle March's big watch, with the red seal so many childish hands had played with, and in a box all by itself lay Aunt March's wedding ring, too small now for her fat finger, but put carefully away like the most precious jewel of them all.
It was like any other cavern of the mountains, though wonderful for the number of crystal formations on the root and walls--formations that sparkled like a million diamonds in the flickering lights.
exclaimed Miss Mayblunt, with lorgnette directed toward a magnificent cluster of diamonds that sparkled, that almost sputtered, in Edna's hair, just over the center of her forehead.
For example, an uncle--who had sailed for India fifty years before, and never been heard of since--might yet return, and adopt her to be the comfort of his very extreme and decrepit age, and adorn her with pearls, diamonds, and Oriental shawls and turbans, and make her the ultimate heiress of his unreckonable riches.
It had, indeed, a very cheery aspect, the walls being overspread with a kind of stucco, in which fragments of broken glass were plentifully intermixed; so that, when the sunshine fell aslant-wise over the front of the edifice, it glittered and sparkled as if diamonds had been flung against it by the double handful.
At the same instant a stout woman, with painted cheeks and diamonds in her ears, came running down the stairs, panting breathlessly: "To the rear
Away down on the level under the black mass of the Castle, the town lay, stretched along the river, its intricate cobweb of streets jeweled with twinkling lights; there were rows of lights on the bridges; these flung lances of light upon the water, in the black shadows of the arches; and away at the extremity of all this fairy spectacle blinked and glowed a massed multitude of gas-jets which seemed to cover acres of ground; it was as if all the diamonds in the world had been spread out there.
It was the splendidest sight that ever was when they all come riding in, two and two, a gentleman and lady, side by side, the men just in their drawers and undershirts, and no shoes nor stirrups, and resting their hands on their thighs easy and comfortable -- there must a been twenty of them -- and every lady with a lovely complexion, and per- fectly beautiful, and looking just like a gang of real sure-enough queens, and dressed in clothes that cost millions of dollars, and just littered with diamonds.
In five minutes they returned, the little ones bearing plates of thin caraway wafers,--hearts, diamonds, and circles daintily sugared, and flecked with caraway seed raised in the garden behind the house.
And, Miss Eyre, so much was I flattered by this preference of the Gallic sylph for her British gnome, that I installed her in an hotel; gave her a complete establishment of servants, a carriage, cashmeres, diamonds, dentelles, &c.
She was rather thin, but young, and fresh-complexioned, and her eyes sparkled as bright as diamonds.
He had rubies and emeralds and diamonds stuck all over him.