Diana


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Di·an·a

 (dī-ăn′ə)
n. Roman Mythology
The virgin goddess of hunting and childbirth, associated with the moon and identified with the Greek Artemis.

[Middle English, from Latin Diāna; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots.]

Diana

, Princess of Wales Title of Lady Diana Frances Spencer. 1961-1997.
British consort of Charles, Prince of Wales, from 1981 until their divorce in 1996.

Diana

(daɪˈænə)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt and the moon. Greek counterpart: Artemis
2. (Biography) title Diana, Princess of Wales, original name Lady Diana Frances Spencer. 1961–97, she married Charles, Prince of Wales, in 1981; they were divorced in 1996: died in a car crash

Di•an•a

(daɪˈæn ə)

n.
1. (Lady Diana Spencer), 1961–97, former wife of Charles, Prince of Wales.
2. a Roman goddess associated with forests and childbirth: identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Diana - English aristocrat who was the first wife of Prince Charles; her death in an automobile accident in Paris produced intense national mourning (1961-1997)
2.Diana - (Roman mythology) virgin goddess of the hunt and the Moon; counterpart of Greek Artemis
Roman mythology - the mythology of the ancient Romans
Translations
Diana
Diana
Diana

Diana

[daɪˈænə] NDiana

Diana

nDiana f

Diana

, complex of
n. complejo de Diana, la adopción de características y conducta masculina por parte de una mujer.
References in classic literature ?
Listen, Diana," said one of the absorbed students; "Franz and old Daniel are together in the night-time, and Franz is telling a dream from which he has awakened in terror--listen
But, on examination, I found that, as for logic, its syllogisms and the majority of its other precepts are of avail- rather in the communication of what we already know, or even as the art of Lully, in speaking without judgment of things of which we are ignorant, than in the investigation of the unknown; and although this science contains indeed a number of correct and very excellent precepts, there are, nevertheless, so many others, and these either injurious or superfluous, mingled with the former, that it is almost quite as difficult to effect a severance of the true from the false as it is to extract a Diana or a Minerva from a rough block of marble.
your parents have chosen you a bride built on the model of Diana, the huntress, and yet you are not content.
While he was thus in two minds Helen came down from her high vaulted and perfumed room, looking as lovely as Diana herself.
The queen was in a morning gown, but it became her still; for, like Diana of Poictiers and Ninon, Anne of Austria enjoyed the privilege of remaining ever beautiful; nevertheless, this morning she looked handsomer than usual, for her eyes had all the sparkle inward satisfaction adds to expression.
And I believe there have been plenty of young heroes, of middle stature and feeble beards, who have felt quite sure they could never love anything more insignificant than a Diana, and yet have found themselves in middle life happily settled with a wife who waddles.
Diana herself had taught him how to kill every kind of wild creature that is bred in mountain forests, but neither she nor his famed skill in archery could now save him, for the spear of Menelaus struck him in the back as he was flying; it struck him between the shoulders and went right through his chest, so that he fell headlong and his armour rang rattling round him.
She and Diana Barry had been picking apples in the Green Gables orchard, but were now resting from their labors in a sunny corner, where airy fleets of thistledown drifted by on the wings of a wind that was still summer-sweet with the incense of ferns in the Haunted Wood.
If she doesn't like you it won't matter how much Diana does.
Thanks be, I'm done with geometry, learning or teaching it," said Anne Shirley, a trifle vindictively, as she thumped a somewhat battered volume of Euclid into a big chest of books, banged the lid in triumph, and sat down upon it, looking at Diana Wright across the Green Gables garret, with gray eyes that were like a morning sky.
It was the amiable Diana, still very confused, who crept out of her retreat, though not without much persuasion, Michel Ardan encouraging her with most gracious words.
Frou-Frou, excited and over-nervous, had lost the first moment, and several horses had started before her, but before reaching the stream, Vronsky, who was holding in the mare with all his force as she tugged at the bridle, easily overtook three, and there were left in front of him Mahotin's chestnut Gladiator, whose hind-quarters were moving lightly and rhythmically up and down exactly in front of Vronsky, and in front of all, the dainty mare Diana bearing Kuzovlev more dead than alive.